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Open Posted By: ahmad8858 Date: 14/02/2021 High School Essay Writing

 Please review the article "Don't Treat Clients Like Competitors" listed attached.  What are you overall thoughts about the article?  What 4 major points do you believe this article is making about trust-based selling?  How do these four points align with the content of Chapter 4?  Are there any points in the article with which you disagree?  Would you recommend this article to a new salesperson just starting in the business? 


350-500 Words 

Category: Business & Management Subjects: Business Law Deadline: 12 Hours Budget: $150 - $300 Pages: 3-6 Pages (Medium Assignment)

Attachment 1

take the tq diagnostic testnew are you as trustworthy as you think?

a Trusted Advisor.com article Charles H. Green, 2006

The words “trust” and “selling” are rarely mentioned in the same sentence, and some people feel that “trust-based selling” is an oxymoron. That says something about the relationships between sellers and their clients.

And it’s one reason that professional services firms don’t like the “S” word. We prefer euphemisms like “business development,” itself phrased in the passive voice as if to distance ourselves as far as possible from the crassness of commerce.

Trust-based Selling® is a principled way of approaching the com- mercial relationship between two parties. It is not a methodology, or a process model; it can coexist with existing methodologies or processes, as long as they are not manipulative or selfish.

People—including sophisticated clients—are overwhelmingly dis- posed to buy what they need to buy anyway from someone they trust. They trust people who are trustworthy— worthy of trust. Trustworthiness can be defined as behavior in accord with certain principles.

Relevant Resources

Article:

Clients, Values and

Guiding Principles

Article:

The Relationship

is the Customer

Blog Post:

Four Principles of

Organizational Trust:

How to Make Your

Company Trustworthy

Don’t Treat Clients Like Competitors! The Four Principles of Trust-Based Selling

2

take the tq diagnostic testnew are you as trustworthy as you think?

Charles H. Green, 2006

Don’t Treat Clients Like Competitors! The Four Principles of Trust-Based Selling

There are four such principles. Trust-based Selling means applying these prin- ciples across all stages of the sales process, all

aspects of selling, and all characteristics of

the client/professional relationship. Those

principles are:

Client focus for the sake of the client;1. Medium to long-term 2.

perspective;

A habit of collaboration with 3. the client; and

Transparency in all things 4. with the client.

In total, the principles of

Trust-based Selling define an

alternative to the heavily compe-

tition-based paradigm that defines

most approaches to selling.

Let’s look first at each principle and its

applications.

Client Focus for the Client’s Sake

A lot of what goes by the name “client focus”

or “customer-centric” these days is a bit mis-

leading. It is client-focused, all right—but in

the same sense that a vulture is client-focused.

The focus benefits the seller, not the buyer.

For example, loyalty programs are designed

by paying very close attention to exactly

what clients are looking for. CRM systems

are designed (and sold) to allow very fine

analyses of client behaviors and preferences.

But in each case, their ultimate purpose is

to enhance the bottom line of the seller, not

the client.

The more refined and the more pervasive

those measurements become, the more obvi-

ous it becomes to the client that “having his

needs met” isn’t really about him at all. Instead,

it’s about getting a greater share of his wallet.

When we treat clients like we treat supply

chains, they will feel like supply chains. They

become means to the seller’s ends, rather than

valued as ends in themselves.

Client vulture focus comes from the com-

petitive paradigm: a semi-conscious belief

that selling is a zero-sum game in which we

compete with our clients.

In Trust-based Selling, client focus is prac-

ticed for the sake of the client. This doesn’t

mean we are oblivious to the impact on us as

When we

treat clients like

we treat supply

chains, they will

feel like supply

chains.

3

take the tq diagnostic testnew are you as trustworthy as you think?

Charles H. Green, 2006

Don’t Treat Clients Like Competitors! The Four Principles of Trust-Based Selling

sellers, but it does mean we approach clients

in fundamentally different ways.

Medium to Long-Term Perspective

A lot of firms feel that their time perspective

is reasonable—a bit short-term, perhaps, but not

out of line. But look at behaviors.

Most approaches to profes-

sional selling are derived from

industrial process models;

they all have a few things

in common. For one, they all

have arrows, going from left

to right. For another, the last

step is almost always “closing,” followed by

a feedback loop that says “go back to start

and repeat.” That is a short-term model. It’s a

transaction model whose end is closing. How

much reward does your firm give to maintain-

ing the relationship and how much to the sum

of the year’s transactions?

Trust-based Selling focuses on the rela-

tionship, not the transaction. This longer-

term focus takes care of much of the concern

that some people have over the client focus

principle. They need not worry that the client

will take advantage of free services and bleed

the provider dry.

In the long term, it is not just unfair but

infeasible for the provider to lose money and

the client to make money. In the long term,

unequal relationships are simply unsustainable.

The discipline of thinking long-term forces

provider and client alike to think in terms of

win-win or lose-lose, rather than the competi-

tive paradigm of win-lose or lose-win.

A Habit of Collaboration In most approaches to selling, the firm

and client spend most of their time apart

from each other. Firms spend the majority

of their time imagining what the client might

be thinking, how the client might react to our

guess about what they might be thinking, and

even more time developing elaborate “what-if ”

scenarios about how to respond to and control

the client’s reactions to our guesses. What an

elaborate substitute for simply asking clients

what they think and talking about it!

Again, the paradigm underlying the usual

belief is competition. We act like face time

Trust-

based Selling

focuses on the

relationship, not

the transaction.

4

take the tq diagnostic testnew are you as trustworthy as you think?

Charles H. Green, 2006

Don’t Treat Clients Like Competitors! The Four Principles of Trust-Based Selling

must be “managed,” as if client interactions

are theatrical events which require staging

and rehearsal.

Trust-based Selling urges collabora-

tion. Significant selling acts are undertaken

together. The next time you write a pro-

posal, instead of doing it back at the office

and FedExing and emailing .pdf

files, what if you were to book

the conference room and write

the proposal with the client

with each of you bringing to

the process all the informa-

tion needed to prepare the best

proposal possible?

That is collaboration. It

doesn’t guarantee you get the job.

That’s not the point. The point is to help the

client get the best possible proposal while you

are secure in the belief that, if you behave con-

sistently in a trustworthy manner, you will get

more than your fair share of the business—in

truth, much more.

Again, the resistance to collaboration comes

from our internalized beliefs that somehow

we are in competition with our clients.

Transparency in All Things Being trustworthy means, above all else,

having the client’s best interests at heart. One

way to demonstrate this is to be open with

them in all mutual affairs. Conversely, the

biggest reason a client might suspect we don’t

have their best interests at heart is a sense

that we are hiding something. So make sure

your policies are right and then don’t hide

anything.

In particular, be willing to discuss sensi-

tive issues like pricing policies, reasons for

discounts, leverage models, overhead models,

staff assignment models, even billing rates.

And be prepared to insist that if you share

such information, the client will give you

adequate time to do a good job of putting

that information in its proper context.

Most firms find transparency the most radi-

cal principle of all: “There’s no way we’d tell

them our billing rates. They’d freak out!” But

they already know you have billing rates and

make their own guesses without any context

to understand them. Remember your feelings

when you first heard your billing rate? Most

likely initially you were overwhelmed with

Being

trustworthy

means, above

all else, having

the client’s best

interests at heart.

5

take the tq diagnostic testnew are you as trustworthy as you think?

Charles H. Green, 2006

Don’t Treat Clients Like Competitors! The Four Principles of Trust-Based Selling

responsibility. Later, you started wondering

where all that money went.

It’s the same with clients. The solution isn’t

to keep secrets from them; it’s to explain real-

ity to them. You gain three benefits by being

transparent:

You show you’ve got nothing to hide;1. You distinguish yourself by so 2. doing;

If your policies are weak, 3. wrong or inconsistent, you’ll

find out fast and have to fix

them so they’re stronger—in

which case, repeat the first

two benefits.

Why do we resist transpar-

ency? Again, the culprit is the com-

petitive mindset we bring to bear in selling. In

this case, we are afraid that if we share certain

information, the “other party”—in this case,

a potential client—will use that information

against us, or we will lose advantage. That is

the language of competition, not of trusted

relationships.

We must stop viewing our clients as our

competitors. What we fear, we empower. If

we treat our potential clients as competitors

during the sales process, we will end up with

competitors.

The cycle has to stop with us. We need to

sell from principles of trust, rather than from

principles that create more competitors in the

very process of gaining clients. Trust begins

in the sales process, if we have the courage

to put it there.We must

stop viewing

our clients as

our competitors.

What we fear, we

empower.

Take the TQ Diagnostic Test

6

take the tq diagnostic testnew are you as trustworthy as you think?

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