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Argumentative Essay

Open Posted By: ahmad8858 Date: 11/01/2021 High School Assignment Writing

Complete with the next rubric:

 Idea: The argument is well introduced and has a solid stance and 2 reasons. Counterclaim is acknowledged and refuted 

Voice: The claim is supported by logical reasons and 4 pieces of relevant evidence. Evidence is thoroughly explained 

  Word Choice:  The writer’s exceptional word choice captures tone and purpose. 

Conventions: Punctuation and grammar are correct. The writing is free from spelling errors. 

Make an argumentative essay with 5 - 6 paragraphs about " Do we depend on technology to much ? " with the following sources ( AND ONLY THESE SOURCES )  

Category: Engineering & Sciences Subjects: Electrical Engineering Deadline: 12 Hours Budget: $150 - $300 Pages: 3-6 Pages (Medium Assignment)

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UNIT 3

Discuss It How does modern technology help us solve problems in new ways?

Write your response before sharing your ideas.

Dog Receives Prosthetic Legs Made by 3-D Printer

Modern Technology

Technology has become

an important part of our

lives, creating solutions

but also new problems.

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UNIT INTRODUCTION

PERFORMANCE-BASED ASSESSMENT Argument: Essay and Oral Presentation

PROMPT:

Do we rely on technology too much?

PERFORMANCE-BASED ASSESSMENT PREP

Review Evidence for an Argument PERFORMANCE TASK

SPEAKING AND LISTENING FOCUS:

Deliver a Multimedia Presentation

PERFORMANCE TASK

WRITING FOCUS:

Write an Argument

SMALL-GROUP LEARNING

WHOLE-CLASS LEARNING

INDEPENDENT LEARNING

NEWS ARTICLE

7-Year-Old Girl Gets New Hand From 3-D Printer John Rogers

NEWS ARTICLE

Screen Time Can Mess With the Body’s “Clock” Andrew Bridges

NEWS ARTICLE

Teen Researchers Defend Media Multitasking Sumathi Reddy

ANCHOR TEXT: BLOG POST

Teens and Technology Share a Future Stefan Etienne

ANCHOR TEXT: BLOG POST

The Black Hole of Technology Leena Khan

MEDIA: VIDEO

The Internet of Things IBM Social Media

POETRY COLLECTION

All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace Richard Brautigan

Sonnet, without Salmon Sherman Alexie

SHORT STORY

The Fun They Had Isaac Asimov

BLOG POST

Is Our Gain Also Our Loss? Cailin Loesch

MEDIA: PODCAST

Bored . . . and Brilliant? A Challenge to Disconnect From Your Phone NPR

UNIT 3

ANCHOR TEXT: SHORT STORY

Feathered Friend Arthur C. Clarke

ESSENTIAL QUESTION:

How is modern technology helpful and harmful to society?

LAUNCH TEXT

ARGUMENT MODEL

That’s Not Progress!

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UNIT 3 INTRODUCTION

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Unit Goals Throughout this unit, you will deepen your understanding of the impact of modern technology on society by reading, writing, speaking, listening, and presenting. These goals will help you succeed on the Unit Performance‑Based Assessment.

Rate how well you meet these goals right now. You will revisit your ratings later when you reflect on your growth during this unit.

READING GOALS

• Read and determine authors’ points of view and evaluate ideas expressed in both literary works and nonfiction texts.

• Expand your knowledge and use of academic and concept vocabulary.

WRITING AND RESEARCH GOALS

• Write an argument to support a claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

• Conduct research projects of various lengths to explore a topic and clarify meaning.

LANGUAGE GOAL

• Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claims and reasons.

SPEAKING AND LISTENING GOALS

• Engage in collaborative discussions, build on the ideas of others, and express your own ideas clearly.

• Integrate audio, visuals, and text in presentations.

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NOT AT ALL NOT VERY SOMEWHAT VERY EXTREMELY WELL WELL WELL WELL WELL

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 STANDARDS Language Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

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ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How is modern technology helpful and harmful to society?

WORD MENTOR SENTENCES PREDICT MEANING RELATED WORDS

convince

ROOT:

-vict-/-vinc-

“conquer”

1. To convince the jury, the lawyer presented evidence of the woman’s innocence.

2. I will try to convince my mother that I need new clothes, even though she bought me a new shirt last week.

convincingly; unconvincing

certain

ROOT:

-cert-

“sure”

1. The band became famous for having a certain jangly sound in their music.

2. I will be certain to study before the next test.

sufficient

ROOT:

-fic-/-fac-

“make”; “do”

1. We brought a sufficient amount of food and water for a week’s worth of camping.

2. Studying an hour a day during the week before the test is sufficient to do well.

declare

ROOT:

-clar-

“clear”

1. Many officials will declare their support of the mayor’s campaign by speaking at the press conference.

2. Ruthie was about to declare her innocence, but the chocolate stain on her face and the empty cookie jar told the truth.

various

ROOT:

-var-

“different”

1. There are various tips for effective public speaking, including speaking clearly and making eye contact.

2. We discussed various places to host the event—many of which were close to home.

Academic Vocabulary: Argument Understanding and using academic terms can help you read, write, and speak with precision and clarity. Here are five academic words that will be useful in this unit as you analyze and write argumentative texts.

Complete the chart.

1. Review each word, its root, and the mentor sentences.

2. Use the information and your own knowledge to predict the meaning of each word.

3. For each word, list at least two related words.

4. Refer to the dictionary or other resources if needed.

Follow Through

Study the words on this chart, and mark them or their forms wherever they appear in the unit.

Unit Introduction 187

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Social networking has become a big part of our lives, and its negative effects can be overlooked. But mental health experts are starting to notice—and what they are finding is disturbing.

As the popularity of social media skyrockets, so do reports of “Facebook depression.” Like other kinds of depression, its common signs are anxiety, low self-confidence, and loneliness.

This form of depression hits those who worry too much about what others think. It largely affects young people because they tend to worry most about others’ opinions. The constant need to see how they’re “measuring up” can cause people to feel huge amounts of stress.

Studies have found that people who get their sense of self-worth from others are more likely to keep checking their status. They want to monitor their updates, wall posts, and photos to see how well or how poorly they’re measuring up. The feeling that they’re missing out on something makes it hard to take a break. And they don’t have to—smartphones have made it possible to log in from any place at any time. The result is more stress.

Social networking can cause serious emotional problems. Everyone knows the effects of online bullying. There are other ways to damage a person’s self-confidence. “When ‘friends’

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UNIT 3 INTRODUCTION

LAUNCH TEXT | ARGUMENT MODEL

NOTES

That’s Not Progress!

This selection is an example of an argument, a type of writing in which the author states and supports a position or claim. This is the type of writing you will develop in the Performance-Based Assessment at the end of the unit.

As you read, notice the way that the writer builds an argument. Mark the text to help answer this question: What is the author’s position and how does the author support it?

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 WORD NETWORK FOR MODERN TECHNOLOGY

Vocabulary A Word Network is a collection of words related to a topic. As you read the selections in this unit, identify interesting words related to the impact of modern technology, and add them to your Word Network. For example, you might begin by adding words from the Launch Text, such as stress, status, and community. Continue to add words as you complete this unit.

Tool Kit Word Network Model

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ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How is modern technology helpful and harmful to society?

NOTES upload unflattering photos and post mean comments, it can seriously damage a person’s self-image,” says one mental health expert. In additiion, getting no response to a post or not being “friended” can also be very painful.

The effects can be physical, too. Frequent users of social media often suffer from pain in their fingers and wrists. Blood vessels in their eyes and necks can narrow. Their backs can ache from being hunched over phones and computers for hours at a time.

Texting is another problem created by technology. Half the nation’s youth send 50 or more text messages a day. One study found that young people send an average of 34 texts a night after they get into bed! This loss of sleep can affect the ability to concentrate, problem-solve, and learn.

Not all experts agree with this analysis. Some point to the benefits of social media. Dr. Megan Moreno is an assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine. She believes that social networking helps develop a young person’s sense of community. She also believes that it can be used to identify youth who are most at risk for depression. “Our studies have found that adolescents often share feelings of depression on Facebook,” she says. “Social media is a tool; it cannot in and of itself cause mental illness,” says Dr. Moreno. She insists that young people had problems before computers came into being.

Maybe so. In the past, however, young people found ways to escape from their problems. Now, smartphones and other high- tech devices have made escape impossible. Is that progress?

Technology should simplify life, not complicate it. The danger of social media is that young users can eventually lose their ability to focus on what is most important in life—no matter what path they choose to follow. ❧

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Modern Technology

stress

status

community

That’s Not Progress! 189

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UNIT 3 INTRODUCTION

Launch Activity Conduct a Walk-Around Debate Consider this statement: Technology improves our lives by providing us with access to large amounts of information quickly.

• Prepare for the debate by thinking about the topic. Consider how access to smartphones and the Internet affects your life and the lives of people you know.

• Jot down your ideas about the topic.

• Decide whether you agree or disagree with the statement, and write your opinion on a sticky note that you stick to your clothes.

• Walk around the room, and share your ideas about the topic with at least two people who do not hold your opinion.

• At the end of the debate, determine how many people in the room changed their opinions, and why.

Summary Write a summary of “That’s Not Progress!” A summary is a concise, complete, and accurate overview of a text. It should not include a statement of your opinion or an analysis.

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ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How is modern technology helpful and harmful to society?

QuickWrite Consider class discussions, the video, and the Launch Text as you think about the prompt. Record your first thoughts here.

PROMPT: Do we rely on technology too much?

 EVIDENCE LOG FOR MODERN TECHNOLOGY Review your QuickWrite. Summarize your point of view in one sentence to record in your Evidence Log. Then, record evidence from “That’s Not Progress!” that supports your point of view.

After each selection, you will continue to use your Evidence Log to record the evidence you gather and the connections you make. This graphic shows what your Evidence Log looks like.

Title of Text: Date:

CONNECTION TO PROMPT TEXT EVIDENCE/DETAILS ADDITIONAL NOTES/IDEAS

How does this text change or add to my thinking? Date:

Tool Kit Evidence Log Model

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OVERVIEW: WHOLE-CLASS LEARNING

STRATEGY ACTION PLAN

Listen actively • Eliminate distractions. For example, put your cellphone away.

• Keep your eyes on the speaker.

Clarify by asking questions

• If you’re confused, other people probably are, too. Ask a question to help your whole class.

• If you see that you are guessing, ask a question instead.

Monitor understanding

• Notice what information you already know and be ready to build on it.

• Ask for help if you are struggling.

Interact and share ideas

• Share your ideas and answer questions, even if you are unsure.

• Build on the ideas of others by adding details or making a connection.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION:

How is modern technology helpful and harmful to society? Technology and social media have become central parts of today’s world—but are they truly improving our lives? You will work with your whole class to explore the impact of modern technology on society. The selections you will read present insights into its positive and negative effects.

Whole-Class Learning Strategies Throughout your life, in school, in your community, and in your career, you will continue to learn and work in large-group environments.

Review these strategies and the actions you can take to practice them as you work with your whole class. Add ideas of your own for each step. Get ready to use these strategies during Whole-Class Learning.

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PERFORMANCE TASK WRITING FOCUS

Write an Argument The Whole-Class selections illustrate ways in which technology has affected our everyday lives. After reading the texts and watching the video, you will write an argument in the form of an editorial about the impact of modern technology.

ANCHOR TEXT: SHORT STORY

Feathered Friend Arthur C. Clarke

What happens when an astronaut brings his pet canary to space?

ANCHOR TEXT: BLOG POST

Teens and Technology Share a Future Stefan Etienne

How can the teens of today help shape the future?

ANCHOR TEXT: BLOG POST

The Black Hole of Technology Leena Khan

Is more information better, or does it distract us from what really matters?

MEDIA: VIDEO

The Internet of Things IBM Social Media

In what ways does the connection between the Internet and our devices affect everyday life?

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Overview: Whole-Class Learning 193

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MAKING MEANING

About the Author

With more than one hundred million copies of his books in print worldwide, Arthur C. Clarke (1917– 2008) may have been the most successful science- fiction writer of all time. He is known for combining his knowledge of technology and science with touches of poetry. Clarke once said, “The only way of finding the limits of the possible is by going beyond them into the impossible.”

Feathered Friend Concept Vocabulary You will encounter the following words as you read “Feathered Friend.” Before reading, note how familiar you are with each word. Then, rank the words in order from most familiar (1) to least familiar (5).

WORD YOUR RANKING

pathetically

distressed

mournfully

apologetically

lamented

After completing the first read, come back to the concept vocabulary and review your rankings. Mark changes to your original rankings as needed.

First Read FICTION Apply these strategies as you conduct your first read. You will have an opportunity to complete the close-read notes after your first read.

NOTICE whom the story is about, what happens, where and when it happens, and why those involved react as they do.

CONNECT ideas within the selection to what you already know and what you have already read.

ANNOTATE by marking vocabulary and key passages you want to revisit.

RESPOND by completing the Comprehension Check and by writing a brief summary of the selection.

Tool Kit First-Read Guide and Model Annotation

 STANDARDS Reading Literature By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

194 UNIT 3 • MODERN TECHNOLOGY

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NOTES

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BACKGROUND This story was written during the 1950s, a time of growth and technological advancement in the United States. The possibility of space exploration created a feeling of immense potential. This optimism about the future influenced all areas of the arts, especially popular literature, in what is now called the Golden Age of Science Fiction.

To the best of my knowledge, there’s never been a regulation that forbids one to keep pets in a space station. No one ever thought it was necessary—and even had such a rule existed, I am quite certain that Sven Olsen would have ignored it.

With a name like that, you will picture Sven at once as a six- foot-six Nordic giant, built like a bull and with a voice to match. Had this been so, his chances of getting a job in space would have been very slim. Actually he was a wiry little fellow, like most of the early spacers, and managed to qualify easily for the 150-pound bonus that kept so many of us on a reducing diet.

Sven was one of our best construction men, and excelled at the tricky and specialized work of collecting assorted girders as they floated around in free fall, making them do the slow-motion, three-dimensional ballet that would get them into their right positions, and fusing the pieces together when they were precisely dovetailed into the intended pattern: It was a skilled and difficult job, for a spacesuit is not the most convenient of garbs in which to work. However, Sven’s team had one great advantage over the construction gangs you see putting up skyscrapers down on

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ANCHOR TEXT | SHORT STORY

Feathered Friend Arthur C. Clarke

Feathered Friend 195

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NOTES Earth. They could step back and admire their handiwork without being abruptly parted from it by gravity. . . .

Don’t ask me why Sven wanted a pet, or why he chose the one he did. I’m not a psychologist, but I must admit that his selection was very sensible. Claribel weighed practically nothing, her food requirements were tiny—and she was not worried, as most animals would have been, by the absence of gravity.

I first became aware that Claribel was aboard when I was sitting in the little cubbyhole laughingly called my office, checking through my lists of technical stores to decide what items we’d be running out of next. When I heard the musical whistle beside my ear, I assumed that it had come over the station intercom, and waited for an announcement to follow. It didn’t; instead, there was a long and involved pattern of melody that made me look up with such a start that I forgot all about the angle beam just behind my head. When the stars had ceased to explode before my eyes, I had my first view of Claribel.

She was a small yellow canary, hanging in the air as motionless as a hummingbird—and with much less effort, for her wings were quietly folded along her sides. We stared at each other for a minute; then, before I had quite recovered my wits, she did a curious kind of backward loop I’m sure no earthbound canary had ever managed, and departed with a few leisurely flicks. It was quite obvious that she’d already learned how to operate in the absence of gravity, and did not believe in doing unnecessary work.

Sven didn’t confess to her ownership for several days, and by that time it no longer mattered, because Claribel was a general pet. He had smuggled her up on the last ferry from Earth, when he came back from leave—partly, he claimed, out of sheer scientific curiosity. He wanted to see just how a bird would operate when it had no weight but could still use its wings.

Claribel thrived and grew fat. On the whole, we had little trouble concealing our guest when VIPs from Earth came visiting. A space station has more hiding places than you can count; the only problem was that Claribel got rather noisy when she was upset, and we sometimes had to think fast to explain the curious peeps and whistles that came from ventilating shafts and storage bulkheads. There were a couple of narrow escapes—but then who would dream of looking for a canary in a space station?

We were now on twelve-hour watches, which was not as bad as it sounds, since you need little sleep in space. Though of course there is no “day” and “night” when you are floating in permanent sunlight, it was still convenient to stick to the terms. Certainly when I woke that “morning” it felt like 6:00 a.m. on Earth. I had

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CLOSE READ ANNOTATE: Mark details in paragraph 6 that describe the canary’s appearance and movements.

QUESTION: Why does the author include so much descriptive detail about the canary?

CONCLUDE: What aspects of life in space does this description help readers imagine?

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NOTES a nagging headache, and vague memories of fitful, disturbed dreams. It took me ages to undo my bunk straps, and I was still only half awake when I joined the remainder of the duty crew in the mess. Breakfast was unusually quiet, and there was one seat vacant.

‘’Where’s Sven?” I asked, not very much caring. “He’s looking for Claribel,” someone answered. “Says he can’t

find her anywhere. She usually wakes him up.” Before I could retort that she usually woke me up, too, Sven

came in through the doorway, and we could see at once that something was wrong. He slowly opened his hand, and there lay a tiny bundle of yellow feathers, with two clenched claws sticking pathetically up into the air.

“What happened?” we asked, all equally distressed. “I don’t know,” said Sven mournfully. “I just found her like

this.” “Let’s have a look at her,” said Jock Duncan, our cook-doctor-

dietitian. We all waited in hushed silence while he held Claribel against his ear in an attempt to detect any heartbeat.

Presently he shook his head. “I can’t hear anything, but that doesn’t prove she’s dead. I’ve never listened to a canary’s heart,” he added rather apologetically.

“Give her a shot of oxygen,” suggested somebody, pointing to the green-banded emergency cylinder in its recess beside the door. Everyone agreed that this was an excellent idea, and Claribel was tucked snugly into a face mask that was large enough to serve as a complete oxygen tent for her.

To our delighted surprise, she revived at once. Beaming broadly, Sven removed the mask, and she hopped onto his finger. She gave her series of “Come to the cookhouse, boys” trills—then promptly keeled over again.

“I don’t get it,” lamented Sven. “What’s wrong with her? She’s never done this before.”

For the last few minutes, something had been tugging at my memory. My mind seemed to be very sluggish that morning, as if I was still unable to cast off the burden of sleep. I felt that I could do with some of that oxygen—but before I could reach the mask, understanding exploded in my brain. I whirled on the duty engineer and said urgently:

“Jim! There’s something wrong with the air! That’s why Claribel’s passed out. I’ve just remembered that miners used to carry canaries down to warn them of gas.”

“Nonsense!” said Jim. “The alarms would have gone off. We’ve got duplicate circuits, operating independently.”

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pathetically (puh THEHT ihk lee) adv. in a way that causes someone to feel pity

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distressed (dih STREHST) adj. troubled; upset

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mournfully (MAWRN fuh lee) adv. in a way that expresses grief or sadness

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apologetically (uh pol uh JEHT ihk lee) adv. in a way that shows someone is sorry for having done or said something; regretfully

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19 lamented (luh MEHN tihd) v. said in a way that showed sadness or sorrow

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Feathered Friend 197

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NOTES “Er—the second alarm circuit isn’t connected up yet.” His

assistant reminded him. That shook Jim; he left without a word, while we stood arguing and passing the oxygen bottle around like a pipe of peace.

He came back ten minutes later with a sheepish expression. It was one of those accidents that couldn’t possibly happen; we’d had one of our rare eclipses by Earth’s shadow that night: Part of the air purifier had frozen up, and the single alarm in the circuit had failed to go off. Half a million dollars’ worth of chemical and electronic engineering had let us down completely. Without Claribel, we should soon have been slightly dead.

So now, if you visit any space station, don’t be surprised if you hear an inexplicable snatch of birdsong. There’s no need to be alarmed; on the contrary, in fact. It will mean that you’re being doubly safeguarded, at practically no extra expense. ❧

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198 UNIT 3 • MODERN TECHNOLOGY

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Comprehension Check Complete the following items after you complete your first read.

1. Where does the story take place?

2. How does the narrator discover Claribel’s presence?

3. Why does Sven bring Claribel onboard?

4. What causes Claribel to pass out?

5. Notebook Confirm your understanding of the story by writing a summary.

RESEARCH Research to Clarify Choose at least one unfamiliar detail from the text. Briefly research that detail. In what way does the information you learned shed light on an aspect of the story?

Research to Explore Choose something from the text that interests you, and formulate a research question. For example, you may want to learn more about canaries or space stations.

Feathered Friend 199

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MAKING MEANING

Close Read the Text 1. This model, from paragraph 3 of the story, shows two sample

annotations, along with questions and conclusions. Close read the passage, and find another detail to annotate. Then, write a question and your conclusion.

Sven was one of our best construction men, and excelled at the tricky and specialized work of collecting assorted girders as they floated around in free fall, making them do the slow-motion, three- dimensional ballet that would get them into their right positions, and fusing the pieces together when they were precisely dovetailed into the intended pattern. . . .

ANNOTATE: The author combines familiar details of construction work with unfamiliar details of zero gravity.

QUESTION: Why does the author make this choice?

CONCLUDE: The combination of Earth-like details and space-related details creates a startling setting.

ANNOTATE: Some of these details are very technical, but others are very poetic.

QUESTION: Why does Clarke use different types of language to describe Sven’s movements?

CONCLUDE: These details suggest that working in space is both freeing and beautiful, and exacting and scientific.

2. For more practice, go back into the story, and complete the close-read notes.

3. Revisit a section of the text you found important during your first read. Read this section closely, and annotate what you notice. Ask yourself questions such as “Why did the author make this choice?” “What can you conclude?”

Analyze the …

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NOTES

This text is adapted and paraphrased from Stefan Etienne’s blog post.Perhaps it is the years I’ve had in front of a computer, a laptop, or some

sort of device with a screen. I spend my time talking about technology, attending press events in New York City, and meeting the industry’s most interesting people. Everyone is hungry to see what comes next.

With its microchips,1 input methods, operating systems,2 and everything in between, technology of the twenty-first century is a window into a new world. This is especially true for teenagers. Are you curious about something? Then, search for it online. You may even come across the wrong answer at first.

You do more research and eventually uncover the truth. Inside, you feel a little like an adventurer. You’re finding information that you believe will make you a more complete human being. You’ve done us all a great service. You’ve turned over a small stone of information, one in a river of millions. With every stone turned, our picture of the world becomes clearer.

It’s similar to my experience with the polar vortex3 that has been plaguing New York for more than a month. Only when the sun breaks out do I realize how beautiful the snow can be. That’s what computer technology can do. Like sunshine breaking through the cold, it changes how we see things. When you filter out useless messages, tweets, and GIFs,4 you see that you—yes, you—are in control of your own information network. Best of all, you can do anything you want to do with it. There’s no excuse to be confused by that math problem or lack a source to cite in an essay. It’s all on you now.

Of course, you may be thinking, “Here comes a geek. He’s obsessed with technology, preaching about its effectiveness and adaptability. And how it’s great for everyone who is currently a teenager.”

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Stefan Etienne

Teens and Technology Share a Future

1. microchips (MY kroh chihps) n. small pieces of computer technology with integrated circuits. 2. operating systems n. basic software that allow devices to run applications. 3. polar vortex (POH luhr VAWR tehks) n. extremely cold wind near the North Pole or South Pole.

When this blog post was written, cold air from the north polar vortex was affecting New York. 4. GIFs (gihfs; jihfs) n. still and animated digital images.

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NOTESYou’re absolutely right. But even if you are not a geek, you are still immersed in technology. How else would you be reading this blog? How else would you understand what “LOL” means? How else would you be able to send a text message without even thinking about it?

The world is facing many problems, but young people—using the power of technology—have the chance to solve them. Technology connects us in ways no one has ever been connected before. As Henry David Thoreau5 put it long before the Internet existed, “Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each other’s eyes, for just an instant?” If only Thoreau had known that we would be able to look into another person’s eyes—even if they are actually just an image on a screen—thousands of miles away! What superpower could one possibly want when we have technology that lets us meet new people, invent new things, and help others?

Today’s teenagers (as of 2014) have the chance to be the most influential and informed generation we’ve ever seen. But that will only happen if we step up to the challenge and are prepared to take charge in an informed, responsible, and powerful way. (Hopefully, we will not make our problems worse.)

What is better than a will to do great things? The actual actions that will make those great things happen.

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5. Henry David Thoreau (thaw ROH) nineteenth-century writer known for his love of nature and living simply.

“Teens and Technology Share a Future” by Stefan Etienne, from Huffington Post, March 6, 2014. Copyright © 2014. Used with permission of the author.

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