Loading...

The statistical assignment

Open Posted By: highheaven1 Date: 05/01/2021 High School Essay Writing

The statistical assignment that  I can’t do because I don’t understand.I hope the tutor can help me, assist me to complete it together and do it independently without plagiarism.

Category: Engineering & Sciences Subjects: Biology Deadline: 24 Hours Budget: $80 - $120 Pages: 2-3 Pages (Short Assignment)

Attachment 1

Cookies & Privacy  Feedback

Simple random sampling Simple random sampling is a type of probability sampling technique [see our article, Probability sampling, if you do not

know what probability sampling is]. With the simple random sample, there is an equal chance (probability) of selecting each

unit from the population being studied when creating your sample [see our article, Sampling: The basics, if you are unsure

about the terms unit, sample and population]. This article (a) explains what simple random sampling is, (b) how to create a

simple random sample, and (c) the advantages and disadvantages of simple random sampling.

Simple random sampling explained

Creating a simple random sample

Advantages and disadvantages of simple random sampling

Simple random sampling explained

Imagine that a researcher wants to understand more about the career goals of students at a single university. Let's say that

the university has roughly 10,000 students. These 10,000 students are our population (N). Each of the 10,000 students is

known as a unit (although sometimes other terms are used to describe a unit; see Sampling: The basics). In order to select

a sample (n) of students from this population of 10,000 students, we could choose to use a simple random sample.

With simple random sampling, there would an equal chance (probability) that each of the 10,000 students could be selected

for inclusion in our sample. If our desired sample size was around 200 students, each of these students would subsequently

be sent a questionnaire to complete (imagining we choose to collect our data using a questionnaire).

Creating a simple random sample

To create a simple random sample, there are six steps: (a) defining the population; (b) choosing your sample size; (c)

listing the population; (d) assigning numbers to the units; (e) finding random numbers; and (f) selecting your sample.

STEP ONE: Define the population

STEP TWO: Choose your sample size

STEP THREE: List the population

GETTING STARTED QUANTITATIVE DISSERTATIONS FUNDAMENTALS

Quantitative Dissertations Dissertation Essentials Research Strategy Data Analysis

STEP FOUR: Assign numbers to the units

STEP FIVE: Find random numbers

STEP SIX: Select your sample

STEP ONE Define the population

In our example, the population is the 10,000 students at the single university. The population is expressed as N. Since we

are interested in all of these university students, we can say that our sampling frame is all 10,000 students. If we were only

interested in female university students, for example, we would exclude all males in creating our sampling frame, which

would be much less than 10,000 students.

STEP TWO Choose your sample size

Let's imagine that we choose a sample size of 200 students. The sample is expressed as n. This number was chosen

because it reflects the limit of our budget and the time we have to distribute our questionnaire to students. However, we

could have also determined the sample size we needed using a sample size calculation, which is a particularly useful

statistical tool. This may have suggested that we needed a larger sample size; perhaps as many as 400 students.

STEP THREE List the population

To select a sample of 200 students, we need to identify all 10,000 students at the university. If you were actually carrying

out this research, you would most likely have had to receive permission from Student Records (or another department in

the university) to view a list of all students studying at the university. You can read about this later in the article under

Disadvantages of simple random sampling.

STEP FOUR Assign numbers to the units

We now need to assign a consecutive number from 1 to N, next to each of the students. In our case, this would mean

assigning a consecutive number from 1 to 10,000 (i.e., N = 10,000; the population of students at the university).

STEP FIVE Find random numbers

Next, we need a list of random numbers before we can select the sample of 200 students from the total list of 10,000

students. These random numbers can either be found using random number tables or a computer program that generates

these numbers for you.

STEP SIX Select your sample

Finally, we select which of the 10,000 students will be invited to take part in the research. In this case, this would mean

selecting 200 random numbers from the random number table. Imagine the first three numbers from the random number

table were:

0011 (the 11th student from the numbered list of 10,000 students) 9292 (the 9,292nd student from the list) 2001 (the 2,001st student from the list)

We would select the 11th, 9,292nd and 2,001st students from our list to be part of the sample. We keep doing this until we

have all 200 students that we want in our sample.

Advantages and disadvantages of simple random sampling

The advantages and disadvantages of simple random sampling are explained below. Many of these are similar to other

types of probability sampling technique, but with some exceptions. Whilst simple random sampling is one of the 'gold

standards' of sampling techniques, it presents many challenges for students conducting dissertation research at the

undergraduate and master's level.

Advantages of simple random sampling

The aim of the simple random sample is to reduce the potential for human bias in the selection of cases to be included

in the sample. As a result, the simple random sample provides us with a sample that is highly representative of the

population being studied, assuming that there is limited missing data.

Since the units selected for inclusion in the sample are chosen using probabilistic methods, simple random sampling

allows us to make generalisations (i.e., statistical inferences) from the sample to the population. This is a major

advantage because such generalisations are more likely to be considered to have external validity.

Disadvantages of simple random sampling

A simple random sample can only be carried out if the list of the population is available and complete.

Attaining a complete list of the population can be difficult for a number of reasons:

Even if a list is readily available, it may be challenging to gain access to that list. The list may be protected by

privacy policies or require a lengthy process to attain permissions.

There may be no single list detailing the population you are interested in. As a result, it may be difficult and time

consuming to bring together numerous sub­lists to create a final list from which you want to select your sample.

As an undergraduate and master?s level dissertation student, you may simply not have sufficient time to do this.

Many lists will not be in the public domain and their purchase may be expensive; at least in terms of the research

funds of a typical undergraduate or master's level dissertation student.

In terms of human populations (as opposed to other types of populations; see the article: Sampling: The basics),

some of these populations will be expensive and time consuming to contact, even where a list is available.

Assuming that your list has all the contact details of potential participants in the first instance, managing the

different ways (e.g., postal, telephone, email) that may be required to contact your sample may be challenging,

not forgetting the fact that your sample may also be geographical scattered.

In the case of human populations, to avoid potential bias in your sample, you will also need to try and ensure that an

adequate proportion of your sample takes part in the research. This may require re­contacting non­respondents, can be

very time consuming, or reaching out to new respondents.

If you are an undergraduate or master's level dissertation student considering using simple random sampling, you may also

want to read more about how to put together your sampling strategy [see the section: Sampling Strategy].

Contact Us  Cookies & Privacy  Copyright  Terms & Conditions  © 2012 Lund Research Ltd

Attachment 2

Cookies & Privacy  Feedback

Stratified random sampling Stratified random sampling is a type of probability sampling technique [see our article Probability sampling if you do not

know what probability sampling is]. Unlike the simple random sample and the systematic random sample, sometimes we

are interested in particular strata (meaning groups) within the population (e.g., males vs. females; houses vs. apartments,

etc.) [see our article, Sampling: The basics, if you are unsure about the terms unit, sample, strata and population]. With

the stratified random sample, there is an equal chance (probability) of selecting each unit from within a particular stratum

(group) of the population when creating the sample. This article explains (a) what stratified random sampling is, (b) how to

create a stratified random sample, and (c) the advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of stratified random sampling.

Stratified random sampling explained

Creating a stratified random sample

Advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of stratified random sampling

Stratified random sampling explained

Imagine that a researcher wants to understand more about the career goals of students at the University of Bath. Let's say

that the university has roughly 10,000 students. These 10,000 students are our population (N). In order to select a sample

(n) of students from this population of 10,000 students, we could choose to use a simple random sample or a systematic

random sample. However, sometimes we are interested in particular strata (groups) within the population. Therefore, the

stratified random sample involves dividing the population into two or more strata (groups). These strata are expressed as

H.

For example, imagine we were interested in comparing the differences in career goals between male and female students at

the University of Bath. If this was the case, we would want to ensure that the sample we selected had a proportional

number of male and female students. This is known as proportionate stratification (as opposed to disproportionate

stratification, where the sample size of each of the stratum is not proportionate to the population size of the same stratum).

With stratified random sampling, there would an equal chance (probability) that each female or male student could be

selected for inclusion in each stratum of our sample. However, in line with proportionate stratification, the total number of

male and female students included in our sampling frame would only be equal if 5,000 students from the university were

male and the other 5,000 students were female. Since this is unlikely to be the case, the number of units that should be

selected for each stratum (i.e., the number of male and female students selected) will vary. We explain how this is

achieved in the next section: Creating a stratified random sample.

GETTING STARTED QUANTITATIVE DISSERTATIONS FUNDAMENTALS

Quantitative Dissertations Dissertation Essentials Research Strategy Data Analysis

Creating a stratified random sample

To create a stratified random sample, there are seven steps: (a) defining the population; (b) choosing the relevant

stratification; (c) listing the population; (d) listing the population according to the chosen stratification; (e) choosing your

sample size; (f) calculating a proportionate stratification; and (g) using a simple random or systematic sample to select

your sample.

STEP ONE: Define the population

STEP TWO: Choose the relevant stratification

STEP THREE: List the population

STEP FOUR: List the population according to the chosen stratification

STEP FIVE: Choose your sample size

STEP SIX: Calculate a proportionate stratification

STEP SEVEN: Use a simple random or systematic sample to select your sample

STEP ONE Define the population

In our example, the population is the 10,000 students at the University of Bath. The population is expressed as N. Since we

are interested in all of these university students, we can say that our sampling frame is all 10,000 students. If we were only

interested in female university students, for example, we would exclude all males in creating our sampling frame, which

would be much less than 10,000.

STEP TWO Choose the relevant stratification

If we wanted to look at the differences in male and female students, this would mean choosing gender as the stratification,

but it could similarly involve choosing students from different subjects (e.g., social sciences, medicine, engineering,

education, etc.), year groups, or some other variable(s). For the purposes of this example, we will use gender

(male/female) as our strata.

STEP THREE List the population

We need to identify all 10,000 students at the University of Bath. If you were actually carrying out this research, you would

most likely have had to receive permission from Student Records (or another department in the university) to view a list of

all students studying at the university. You can read about this later in the article under Disadvantages (limitations) of

stratified random sampling.

STEP FOUR List the population according to the chosen stratification

As with the simple random sampling and systematic random sampling techniques, we need to assign a consecutive number

from 1 to NK to each of the students in each stratum. As a result, we would end up with two lists, one detailing all male

students and one detailing all female students.

STEP FIVE Choose your sample size

Let's imagine that we choose a sample size of 100 students. The sample is expressed as n. This number was chosen

because it reflects the limit of our budget and the time we have to distribute our questionnaire to students. However, we

could have also determined the sample size we needed using a sample size calculation, which is a particularly useful

statistical tool. This may have suggested that we needed a larger sample size; perhaps as many as 400 students.

STEP SIX Calculate a proportionate stratification

Imagine that of the 10,000 students, 60% of these are female and 40% male. We need to ensure that the number of units

selected for the sample from each stratum is proportionate to the number of males and females in the population. To

achieve this, we first divide the desired sample size (n) by the proportion of units in each stratum. Therefore, to calculate

the number of female students required in our sample, we divide 100 by 0.60 (i.e., 0.60 = 60% of the population of

students at the university), which gives us a total of 60 female students. If we do the same for male students, we get 40

students (i.e., 40% of students are male, where 100 ÷ 0.40 = 40). This means that we need to select 60 female students

and 40 male students for our sample of 100 students.

STEP SEVEN Use a simple random or systematic sample to select your sample

Now that we have chosen to sample 40 male and 60 female students, we still need to select these students from our two

lists of male and female students (see STEP FOUR above). We do this using either simple random sampling or systematic

random sampling [click on the links to see what to do next].

Advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of stratified random sampling

The advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of stratified random sampling are explained below. Many of these are

similar to other types of probability sampling technique, but with some exceptions. Whilst stratified random sampling is one

of the 'gold standards' of sampling techniques, it presents many challenges for students conducting dissertation research at

the undergraduate and master's level.

Advantages of stratified random sampling

The aim of the stratified random sample is to reduce the potential for human bias in the selection of cases to be

included in the sample. As a result, the stratified random sample provides us with a sample that is highly

representative of the population being studied, assuming that there is limited missing data.

Since the units selected for inclusion within the sample are chosen using probabilistic methods, stratified random

sampling allows us to make statistical conclusions from the data collected that will be considered to be valid.

Relative to the simple random sample, the selection of units using a stratified procedure can be viewed as superior

because it improves the potential for the units to be more evenly spread over the population. Furthermore, where the

samples are the same size, a stratified random sample can provide greater precision than a simple random sample.

Because of the greater precision of a stratified random sample compared with a simple random sample, it may be

possible to use a smaller sample, which saves time and money.

The stratified random sample also improves the representation of particular strata (groups) within the population, as

well as ensuring that these strata are not over­represented. Together, this helps the researcher to compare strata, as

well as make more valid inferences from the sample to the population.

Disadvantages (limitations) of stratified random sampling

A stratified random sample can only be carried out if a complete list of the population is available.

It must also be possible for the list of the population to be clearly delineated into each stratum; that is, each unit from

the population must only belong to one stratum. In our example, this would be fairly simple, since our strata are male

and female students. Clearly, a student could only be classified as either male or female. No student could fit into both

categories (ignoring transgender issues).

Furthermore, imagine extending the sampling requirements such that we were also interested in how career goals

changed depending on whether a student was an undergraduate or graduate. Since the strata must be mutually

exclusive and collectively exclusive, this means that we would need to sample four strata from the population:

undergraduate males, undergraduate females, graduate males, and graduate females. This will increase overall sample

size required for the research, which can increase costs and time to carry out the research.

Attaining a complete list of the population can be difficult for a number of reasons:

Even if a list is readily available, it may be challenging to gain access to that list. The list may be protected by

privacy policies or require a length process to attain permissions.

There may be no single list detailing the population you are interested in. As a result, it may be difficult and time

consuming to bring together numerous sub­lists to create a final list from which you want to select your sample.

As an undergraduate and master's level dissertation student, you may simply not have sufficient time to do this.

Indeed, it will be more complex and time consuming to prepare this list compared with simple random sampling

and systematic random sampling.

Many lists will not be in the public domain and their purchase may be expensive; at least in terms of the research

funds of a typical undergraduate or master's level dissertation student.

In terms of human populations (as opposed to other types of populations; see the article: Sampling: The basics),

some of these populations will be expensive and time consuming to contact, even where a list is available.

Assuming that your list has all the contact details of potential participants in the first instance, managing the

different ways (postal, telephone, email) that may be required to contact your sample may be challenging, not

forgetting the fact that your sample may also be geographical scattered.

In the case of human populations, to avoid potential bias in your sample, you will also need to try and ensure that an

adequate proportion of your sample takes part in the research. This may require re­contacting non­respondents, can be

very time consuming, or reaching out to new respondents.

Contact Us  Cookies & Privacy  Copyright  Terms & Conditions  © 2012 Lund Research Ltd

Attachment 3

Please Read very carefully before you start your assignment.

Declaration of Work – Academic Misconduct Refer to the Student Assessment Guide book for full details.

Student Name (full name, including “English” name) ID Number (from your ID card)

Paper FOUN046 Maths for Science

Assignment Name Sampling in Statistics

Teacher

If you have any doubts or questions please see your teacher before you hand in your work.

STUDENT DECLARATION: you must sign this statement as part of your assignment.

I confirm and promise

 that this assignment is entirely my own work and is original work

 that I have not committed plagiarism when completing the attached piece of work

 that source materials have been fully referenced

 that this assignment, or substantial parts of it, have not been submitted for assessment in any other programme or paper

 that I have not committed any form of academic misconduct

 that I have read and am aware of the academic misconduct details in my Student Assessment Guide.

Signature(s)

Date

Attachment 4

Cookies & Privacy  Feedback

Systematic random sampling Systematic random sampling is a type of probability sampling technique [see our article Probability sampling if you do not

know what probability sampling is]. With the systematic random sample, there is an equal chance (probability) of selecting

each unit from within the population when creating the sample. The systematic sample is a variation on the simple random

sample. Rather than referring to random number tables to select the cases that will be included in your sample, you select

units directly from the sample frame [see our article, Sampling: The basics, if you are unsure about the terms unit, sample,

sampling frame and population]. This article explains (a) what systematic random sampling is, (b) how to create a

systematic random sample, and (c) the advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of systematic random sampling.

Systematic random sampling explained

Creating a systematic random sample

Advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of systematic random sampling

Systematic random sampling explained

Imagine that a researcher wants to understand more about the career goals of students at the University of Bath. Let's say

that the university has roughly 10,000 students. These 10,000 students are our population (N). In order to select a sample

(n) of students from this population of 10,000 students, we could choose to use a systematic random sample.

With systematic random sampling, there would an equal chance (probability) that each of the 10,000 students could be

selected for inclusion in our sample. Each of the 10,000 students is known as a unit, a case or an object (these terms are

sometimes used interchangeably; we use the word unit). If our desired sample size was around 400 students, each of these

students would subsequently be sent a questionnaire to complete (imagining we choose to collect our data using a

questionnaire).

Creating a simple random sample

To create a systemic random sample, there are seven steps: (a) defining the population; (b) choosing your sample size; (c)

listing the population; (d) assigning numbers to cases; (e) calculating the sampling fraction; (f) selecting the first unit; and

(g) selecting your sample.

GETTING STARTED QUANTITATIVE DISSERTATIONS FUNDAMENTALS

Quantitative Dissertations Dissertation Essentials Research Strategy Data Analysis

STEP ONE: Define the population

STEP TWO: Choose your sample size

STEP THREE: List the population

STEP FOUR: Assign numbers to cases

STEP FIVE: Calculate the sampling fraction

STEP SIX: Select the first unit

STEP SEVEN: Select your sample

STEP ONE Define the population

In our example, the population is the 10,000 students at the University of Bath. The population is expressed as N. Since we

are interested in all of these university students, we can say that our sampling frame is all 10,000 students. If we were only

interested in female university students, for example, we would exclude all males in creating our sampling frame, which

would be much less than 10,000.

STEP TWO Choose your sample size

Let's imagine that we choose a sample size of 100 students. The sample is expressed as n. This number was chosen

because it reflects the limit of our budget and the time we have to distribute our questionnaire to students. However, we

could have also determined the sample size we needed using a sample size calculation, which is a particularly useful

statistical tool. This may have suggested that we needed a larger sample size; perhaps as many as 400 students.

STEP THREE List the population

To select a sample of 100 students, we need to identify all 10,000 students at the University of Bath. If you were actually

carrying out this research, you would most likely have had to receive permission from Student Records (or another

department in the university) to view a list of all students studying at the university. You can read about this later in the

article under Disadvantages (limitations) of systematic random sampling.

STEP FOUR Assign numbers to cases

We now need to assign a consecutive number from 1 to N, next to each of the students. In our case, this would mean

assigning a consecutive number from 1 to 10,000 (i.e. N = 10,000; your population of students at the university).

STEP FIVE Calculate the sampling fraction

Assuming we have chosen a sample size of 100 students, we now need to work out the sampling fraction, which is simply

the sample size selected (expressed as n) divided by the population size (N). In this case:

The sampling fraction tells us that we need to select 1 student in every 100 students from the population of 10,000 students

at the university. After doing this 100 times, we will have our sample of 100 students. However, first we need to select the

first unit (i.e., the first student), which starts the process of creating our sample.

STEP SIX Select the first unit

Since we need to select 1 student in every 100 students, first we use a random number table to select the first student.

Imagine the first number in the random number table was 0009, we would ignore the first three digits and focus on the last

digit, 9, since this number fits between 0 and 100. As such, our first student would be the 9th on our list of 10,000 students.

STEP SEVEN Select your sample

Now that we know the first unit, namely the 9th student on the list, we can select the other 99 students to make up our

sample of 100 students. Since we need to select 1 student in every 100 students from the list, we use the 9th student as the

starting point and then select every 100th student from this point. As such, we select the 109th student on the list, the 209th

student, the 309th student, and so forth.

Advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of systematic random sampling

The advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of systematic random sampling are explained below. Many of these are

similar to other types of probability sampling technique, but with some exceptions. Whilst systematic random sampling is

one of the "gold standards" of sampling techniques, it presents many challenges for students conducting dissertation

research at the undergraduate and master's level.

Advantages of systematic random sampling

The aim of the systemic random sample is to reduce the potential for human bias in the selection of cases to be

included in the sample. As a result, the systemic random sample provides us with a sample that is highly

representative of the population being studied, assuming that there is limited missing data.

Since the units selected for inclusion within the sample are chosen using probabilistic methods, systemic random

sampling allows us to make statistical conclusions from the data collected that will be considered to be valid.

Relative to the simple random sample, the selection of units using a systematic procedure can be viewed as superior

because it improves the potential for the units to be more evenly spread over the population.

Disadvantages (limitations) of systematic random sampling

A systematic random sample can only be carried out if a complete list of the population is available.

If the list of the population has some kind of standardised arrangement (order/pattern), systematic sampling could pick

out similar cases rather than completely random ones. For example, when Student Records put together the list of the

10,000 students (our example), the list may have been ordered so that each record moved from a male to female

student (i.e., record #1 was a male student, record #2 a female student, record #3 a male student again, and so

forth). This may have been intentional or unintentional. Either way, if we select the 9th student in every hundred from

the list (as per our example; i.e., the 9th, 109th, 209th student, and so forth), we will always select a male student

(i.e., all odd numbers in the list are male students, whilst all even numbers are female students). This will lead to a

very biased sample. In reality, such a bias in the list should be easily seen and corrected. However, sometimes such a

standardised arrangement (order/pattern) may not be obvious or visible, resulting in sampling bias.

Attaining a complete list of the population can be difficult for a number of reasons:

Even if a list is readily available, it may be challenging to gain access to that list. The list may be protected by

privacy policies or require a length process to attain permissions.

There may be no single list detailing the population you are interested in. As a result, it may be difficult and time

consuming to bring together numerous sub­lists to create a final list from which you want to select your sample.

As an undergraduate and master?s level dissertation student, you may simply not have sufficient time to do this.

Many lists will not be in the public domain and their purchase may be expensive; at least in terms of the research

funds of a typical undergraduate or master's level dissertation student.

In terms of human populations (as opposed to other types of populations; see the article: Sampling: The basics),

some of these populations will be expensive and time consuming to contact, even where a list is available.

Assuming that your list has all the contact details of potential participants in the first instance, managing the

different ways (postal, telephone, email) that may be required to contact your sample may be challenging, not

forgetting the fact that your sample may also be geographical scattered.

In the case of human populations, to avoid potential bias in your sample, you will also need to try and ensure that an

adequate proportion of your sample takes part in the research. This may require re­contacting non­respondents, can be

very time consuming, or reaching out to new respondents.

Contact Us  Cookies & Privacy  Copyright  Terms & Conditions  © 2012 Lund Research Ltd