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Final project source strategies

Open Posted By: highheaven1 Date: 25/09/2020 Graduate Coursework Writing

describe your strategy to collect and review scholarly peer-reviewed literature that pertains to your focus subject. In order to increase the quantity and quality of the scholarly information that you summarize.

To prepare for this Assignment:

·  Review the instructions for the Final Project.

·  Review your choice of case study and focus subject from Week 4.

·  Review the Learning Resources from the Cornell University Library and the University of Illinois Library regarding the use of scholarly resources.

·   

Approximately one page in which you do the following:

·  Summarize your strategies for conducting a literature search and finding peer-reviewed articles for your research paper.

·  List 2–4 key words you are using to locate resources.

Approximately one page in which you do the following:

·  Summarize your strategies for conducting a literature search and finding peer-reviewed articles for your research paper.

·  List 2–4 key words you are using to locate resources.

·  List 1–3 articles that you found while doing a preliminary search using your strategy.

Category: Business & Management Subjects: Business Law Deadline: 12 Hours Budget: $120 - $180 Pages: 2-3 Pages (Short Assignment)

Attachment 1

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FPSY 6102 Cases for Final Project

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was 19 years old when he and his older brother planned and committed the bombing of the finish line at the Boston Marathon in April 2013. Three people were killed in the blast that seriously injured many others. According to FBI records, Dzhokhar’s older brother was killed by police while fleeing the crime scene, but Dzhokhar was eventually convicted of the following charges in May 2015: the use of a weapon of mass destruction resulting in death and conspiracy, bombing of a place of public use resulting in death and conspiracy, malicious destruction of property resulting in death and conspiracy, use of a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence, use of a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence causing death, carjacking resulting in serious bodily injury, and interference with commerce by threats of violence. He received the death penalty following his conviction and is currently in prison pending appeal.

According to the BBC (2016), Dzhokhar and his family immigrated to the United States in 2002 from Chechnya. In the 1990s, the family initially fled to Kyrgyzstan, a troubled neighboring country of Chechnya, and Dzhokhar was believed to have been born there in 1994. After the second war broke out in Chechnya in 1999, the family started to make their way to the United States where they arrived in 2002. Dzhokhar become a U.S. citizen in 2012.

The Tsarnaev family settled in the Boston area. At the time of the bombing, Dzokhar was allegedly a second-year medical student at the University of Massachusetts. According to his Facebook page, he was devoted to Islam. Friends of his at the University of Massachusetts were surprised at his involvement in the Boston Marathon bombing (BBC, 2016).

Elizabeth Smart

In 2002, according to Bio (2016), 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart was kidnapped at knife point from the bedroom she shared with her sister in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her captor, Brian Mitchell, and his accomplice, Wanda Barzee, held her captive for 9 months, moving between California and Utah. Mitchell raped her daily, often multiple times a day, and she was frequently tethered to a tree. She was force fed alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs and frequently deprived of food. Brian Mitchell fancied himself to be a prophet and provided Elizabeth with an ongoing tirade of often bizarre religious indoctrinations.

Elizabeth’s younger sister provided police with information that her abductor looked like a man who had worked as a handyman at the family’s home several months prior. Based on this tip, the police identified Brian Mitchell, and the abduction was presented on America’s Most Wanted in February 2003. The following month, someone recognized Mitchell walking with Elizabeth, who was veiled and was in a wig and sunglasses, and called in a tip to the police. Mitchell was arrested and eventually prosecuted. Elizabeth was able to return to her family (Bio, 2016).

Jodi Arias

Jodi Arias brutally murdered her boyfriend in 2008 in his Mesa, Arizona, home. The 28-year-old slit her boyfriend’s throat, stabbed him over two dozen times, and shot him in the head. Following the murder, Jodi initially denied any involvement, but police investigators found her DNA at the crime scene, and she was charged with the murder within a month. Initially, she told police that masked men had broken into her boyfriend’s home while she was there, attacked them both, killing her boyfriend, and then decided to allow her to live (Bio, 2016). Later, she admitted killing her boyfriend but explained that she had done so in self-defense due to ongoing physical abuse by him.

According to Bio (2016), Jodi’s 4-month trial began in January 2013 and was aired live to the public. She testified for 18 days in her own defense. The jury convicted her of first-degree murder but was unable to come to an agreement about her sentencing. Finally, in April 2015, after two deadlocked juries, she was sentenced to life in prison and escaped the death penalty.

During Jodi’s 18 days of testimony, she explained to the jury that her boyfriend had been emotionally and physically abusive to her (Pelisek, 2013). According to her, he vacillated between forcing her to have aggressive sex and then ignoring her, punishing her with emotional aloofness. She shared pictures and text messages to support her claims with the jury. In the end, the jury convicted her despite her claims.

References

Bio. (2016). Elizabeth Smart biography. Retrieved from http://www.biography.com/people/elizabeth-smart-17176406

Bio. (2016). Jodi Arias biography. Retrieved from http://www.biography.com/people/jodi-arias-21221959

British Broadcasting Company (BBC). (2015). Profile: Who is Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev? Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-31734557

Pelisek, C. (2013). Court report: Jodi Arias’s baffling defense strategy. The Daily Beast. Retrieved from http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/17/jodi-arias-s-baffling-defense-strategy.html

U.S. Department of Justice. (2015). Judge imposes death sentence for Boston Marathon bomber. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Retrieved from https://www.fbi.gov/boston/press-releases/2015/judge-imposes-death-sentence-for-boston-marathon-bomber

© 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. Page 3 of 3

Attachment 2

FPSY 6102/FPSY 8102: Intersection of Crime, Psychology, and the Law

Final Project Assignment Rubric (Weeks 4, 5, 6, and 7)

CATEGORY

EXCELLENT – above expectations

GOOD – met expectations

FAIR – below expectations

POOR – significantly below expectations or missing

SCORE

Content

(18 possible points)

Paper demonstrates an excellent understanding of all of the concepts and key points presented in the text/s and Learning Resources. Paper provides significant detail, including multiple relevant examples, evidence from the readings and other sources, and discerning ideas.

(16–18 points)

Paper demonstrates a good understanding of most of the concepts and key points presented in the text/s and Learning Resources. Paper includes moderate detail, evidence from the readings, and discerning ideas.

(14–15 points)

Paper demonstrates a fair understanding of the concepts and key points as presented in the text/s and Learning Resources. Paper may be lacking in detail and specificity and/or may not include sufficient pertinent examples or provide sufficient evidence from the readings.

(12–13 points)

Paper demonstrates poor understanding of the concepts and key points of the text/s and Learning Resources. Paper is missing detail and specificity and/or does not include any pertinent examples or provide sufficient evidence from the readings.

(0–11 points)

     

Writing

(7 possible points)

Paper is well organized, uses scholarly tone, follows APA style, uses original writing and proper paraphrasing, contains very few or no writing and/or spelling errors, and is fully consistent with graduate-level writing style. Paper contains multiple, appropriate, and exemplary sources expected/required for the assignment.

(7 points)

Paper is mostly consistent with graduate-level writing style. Paper may have some small or infrequent organization, scholarly tone, or APA style issues, and/or may contain a few writing and spelling errors, and/or somewhat less than the expected number of or type of sources.

(6 points)

Paper is somewhat below graduate-level writing style, with multiple smaller or a few major problems. Paper may be lacking in organization, scholarly tone, APA style, and/or contain many writing and/or spelling errors, or shows moderate reliance on quoting vs. original writing and paraphrasing. Paper may contain inferior resources (number or quality).

(5 points)

Paper is well below graduate-level writing style expectations for organization, scholarly tone, APA style, and writing, or relies excessively on quoting. Paper may contain few or no quality resources.

(0–4 points)

     

Instructor comments:      

   

Total Score (25 possible points):

      points

© 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. Page 1 of 1