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Drones

Open Posted By: surajrudrajnv33 Date: 15/09/2020 Graduate Rewriting & Paraphrasing

Drones and how this can affect Border Security. Think how on both sides of the border how this could affect transportation and security. Copy link into your browser and comment that also. 


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-colorado-drones/faa-probes-clusters-of-mysterious-drones-flying-over-colorado-idUSKBN1YZ1G0 

Category: Mathematics & Physics Subjects: Physics Deadline: 12 Hours Budget: $120 - $180 Pages: 2-3 Pages (Short Assignment)

Attachment 1

US-based UAS (Unmanned Ariel Systems, IE Drones) Reports Continue to Rise

1. In 2017, there were approximately 3,000 reports of UAS over or near US critical infrastructure,

according to reports from federal, state, local, and private sector security partners, primarily from

firsthand visual reports and UAS recoveries. Despite this, most UAS are likely non-malicious but could

present a risk to public safety. The small size, relatively low cost, and relative ease of use of UAS

makes them attractive to lone offenders or anarchist extremist, criminal, violent extremist, and terrorist

organizations for smuggling, aerial logistics or messaging.

2. sUAS are widely available and relatively inexpensive, ranging in cost from $200 to $5,000, while

commercial UAS, which are not as widely available, can cost up to $30,000 and are more

technologically advanced. Flight times and operational range for UAS of all sizes vary depending on

the payload, battery size, propulsion system, operator skill, and environmental influences like weather

and terrain. sUAS are usually battery powered and can average between 15 and 30 minutes of flight

time while fixed-wing UAS may have longer flight ranges and can fly up to three hours, typically using

combustible fuel.

3. Outlook

The FBI, DHS, and NCTC assess UAS activity over the next 24 months will likely increase

as costs for these systems continue to decrease, technology offers greater range and payload, and

platforms become more user friendly. As hobbyist and commercial use of UAS increases, new and

creative legitimate uses for UAS will likely emerge. However, threat actors could use these legitimate

innovations in sUAS for malicious purposes and could increase usage if a symbolic UAS attack occurs

and inspires other actors to do the same. FBI, DHS, and NCTC urge state and local authorities, as well

as private sector security partners, to promptly report suspicious activities related to UAS.