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Project 3

Open Posted By: ahmad8858 Date: 02/05/2021 Graduate Research Paper Writing
You have to write 1000 words and focus on tast instructions 2 please include all the points abd cover A to D points please abd you should have to respond one person i will send his details to you please respond him and please focus on task instructions. 
Category: Business & Management Subjects: Business Communication Deadline: 12 Hours Budget: $120 - $180 Pages: 2-3 Pages (Short Assignment)

Attachment 1

Module 4 Communication Management

Week 9

PROJ6003 – PROJECT EXECUTION AND CONTROL

Dr Ibrahim Abdallah [email protected]

Learning Facilitator

Master of Global Project Management

Today’s Schedule

What is Communication?

The communication process

Communication requirements and influencing factors

Project Communications Management

- Considerations

- Methods

- Maturity

Risk & Communication

Final Group Activity

• Exchanging information – sending and receiving it – can be intentional or

involuntary.

Communication is Exchange of Information

3

We are communicating all the time through:

• Written form

• Spoken

• Body language

• Facial Expressions

• Tone of voice

• Media (pictures, actions)

• Choice of words

Communication activities and

artifacts:

• Plans, policies

• Meetings

• Status and Progress Reports

• Charts

• Contracts

• Presentations

• Informal conversations

• Project Managers spend most of their time communicating… with everyone,

about anything! So communication skills is a critical asset for PMs.

• It is the job of the PM to ensure that the information is regular, explicit, clear,

and complete.

• Effective communication builds a bridge between diverse stakeholders who

may have different cultural and organisational backgrounds as well as different

levels of expertise, perspectives, and interests.

• Successful communication is dependent on two parts:

• The first part is developing a strategy to ensure communication is effective for

both stakeholders and project’s needs.

• The second part is carrying out the activities necessary to implement the

communication strategy.

Communication is 90% of the PM’s work!

4

• Listening actively

• Awareness of cultural and personal differences

• Identifying, setting, and managing stakeholder

expectations

• Enhancement skills of the team members:

• Persuasion

• Motivation

• Coaching

• Negotiation

• Resolving conflict

Key Communication Skills

5

To communicate

effectively, project

managers must have

a good understanding

of the

communications

process.

6

Understanding Communication Process

PMI (2017, p. 373)

The Shannon and Weaver model

• Communication as a process consisting of two parties (sender/receiver). This model

is concerned with ensuring that the message is delivered rather than understood.

Basic Communication Models: Transmission

7

Transaction: A meaning-oriented model of communication

• This model takes a more

holistic approach. It accounts

for the fact that identical

messages will not necessarily

lead to the same result,

whether they are sent to

different receivers or to the

same receiver at different

times.

• The receiver brings her own

ideas, assumptions, biases and

perceptions to the negotiation

of meaning.

Basic Communication Models: Transaction

8

Comparison between Models

9

The fundamental attributes to develop effective communication are:

• Clarity on the purpose of the communication

• Understanding as much as possible about the receiver of the communications,

meeting needs, and preferences

• Monitoring and measuring the effectiveness of communication.

What do we need for effective communication, then?

10

• Stakeholders will need

different types of information,

depending on their interest in

project and the priority of the

project.

• The project manager will

need to complete the analysis

of the identified stakeholders

to determine what information

they actually need as well as

how often the information is

needed.

Identifying Communication Requirements

Identify the 5Ws and 1H

11

Urgency of the information:

Urgency, frequency, and format. For some projects, information should be readily available, while other projects are less demanding.

Technology: Availability, compatibility and reliability of technology. Because of the demands of the project, technology changes may be needed to fulfil the project request.

Ease of use: Choice of communication method also depends on the ability of its users. The project manager should evaluate the abilities of the project team to determine if appropriate levels of competency exist to fulfil the communication requirements or if training will be required for the project team.

Project length: The length of the project can have an influence on the project technology. Advances in technology may replace a long-term project's communication model.

Project environment:

How a team communicates often depends on its structure. Consider a collocated team versus a virtual team. Each type can be effective, but there will be differing communication demands for each type of team.

Factors affecting choice of Communication Methods and

Technology

12

Barriers to Effective Communication

Large number of audience

Too many intermediaries

Inarticulateness

Terminology

Intellectual

LanguageCustoms

Defensiveness

Hostility

Conflicting opinions

Hidden agendas

STRUCTURAL

VERBAL

WRITTEN

CULTURAL

EMOTIONAL

Communication Barriers

13

14

• Eye contact and voice intonation can be used intentionally to enforce certain

words or phrases…

• In groups, practice different intonation for each words in this sentence for each

time you say it out loud:

• “I didn’t say we should kill him”

Holistic Communications Practice

▪ Discuss your groups what’s the meaning of the

sentence for each time.

▪ Did it change?

15

Project Communications Management

16

Considerations for the Communications Plan

17

• There are several communication methods that are used to share information

among project stakeholders. These methods are broadly classified as follows:

Communication Methods

18

In te

ra c

ti v e

c o

m m

u n

ic a ti

o n

.

• Multidirectional exchange of information in real time.

• E.g. meetings, phone calls, instant messaging, some forms of social media, and videoconferencing.

P u

s h

c o

m m

u n

ic a ti

o n

.

• To specific recipients who need to receive the information. This ensures that the information is distributed but does not ensure that it actually reached or was understood by the intended audience.

• E.g. letters, memos, reports, emails, faxes, voice mails, etc.

P u

ll c

o m

m u

n ic

a ti

o n

.

• For large complex information sets, or for large audiences, and requires the recipients to access content at their own discretion subject to security procedures. These methods include web portals, intranet sites, e-learning, lessons learned databases, or knowledge repositories.

Elements in Communication Management Plan

Stakeholder communication requirements

Information to be

communicated

Reason for the distribution

Distribution timeframe and

frequency

Responsible person for

communication

Responsible person for

authorisation

Communication audience

Communication methods and technologies

Resources allocated for

communication activities

Communication control process

Communication update process

Glossary Flow charts of

information Communication

constraints

19

20

Project Communications Management Maturity

Level 1 – Initial Process

Level 2 - Structured

Process and Standards

Level 3 – Organisational Standards and Institutionalize

d Process

Level 4 – Managed Process

Level 5 – Optimising

Process

21

Management utilizes an ad hoc communications process whereby project status is reported informally.

Plan Communications

No established standards for communications planning are in place. Status reports are provided when required.

Manage Communications

Communications are managed in an ad hoc manner, usually as responses to specific requests or questions about projects.

Control Communications

Performance reporting is handled on an ad hoc basis.L

e v e

l 1

– In

it ia

l P

ro c e

s s

22

A basic communications management process is established. Project status and progress reports are distributed regularly and stakeholders are notified of phase and project completion activities.

Plan Communications

Communication requirements are defined. A communication plan is developed to include needs, reviews, lessons learned and analysis of technology factors.

Manage Communications

Information is distributed via electronic medium or hard-copy documentation. Basic retrieval and distribution processes are in place. Stakeholders are directed to a specific shared site.

Control Communications

Three types of summary reports covering status, progress, and phase completion are generated. Project baselined and actual data are collected. There are acknowledgement of project deliverable acceptances and a formal sign-off.

L e

v e

l 2

– S

tr u

c tu

re d

P ro

c e

s s

a n

d

S ta

n d

a rd

s 23

The communications management process has been institutionalised and formal communications management plans are expected for most projects. Management is involved actively in project performance reviews. Key management is involved in approving all changes that impact the triple constraints.

Plan Communications

Communications plans are expected to be generated for all projects.

Manage Communications

A formal information retrieval system allows project stakeholders to retrieve information from a repository. Project managers regularly confirm stakeholder satisfaction with information dissemination.

Control Communications

Performance reporting contains graphics, histograms and tables accompanying narrative reports of project status and progress. Informal variance and trend analyses are conducted. Performance reviews are conducted to assess project status or progress.

L e v e l 3 –

O rg

a n

is a ti

o n

a l

S ta

n d

a rd

s a

n d

In

s ti

tu ti

o n

a li s e d

P ro

c e s s

24

Communications management plans are mandated for all projects. Communications plans are integrated into corporate communication structure.

Plan Communications

There is a method for updating and refining the communications management plan as a project progresses and develops and is incorporated into corporate information systems.

Manage Communications

The organisation maintains an automated information retrieval system. The information distribution system includes varying formats and multimedia distribution. Project management confirms stakeholder access and satisfaction with the information dissemination system.

Control Communications

All projects are expected to capture performance measurement. Formal variance and trend analysis is conducted on projects.

L e

v e

l 4

– M

a n

a g

e d

P ro

c e

s s

25

A process is in place to continuously improve project communications management. Lessons learned are captured, incorporated into improvement initiatives, and documented into repeatable processes. Management is involved actively in project reviews and process enhancement. Value-added data on project progress is communicated.

Plan Communications

Communications planning documentation and lessons learned are analysed for value- added impacts. Communication planning is linked with organisational planning.

Manage Communications

Total documentation for each project is available for review. Project stakeholders have been educated to access all required project-related information in a timely fashion. Effective information is collected for use in future projects.

Control Communications

Performance metrics are utilised to define efficiency and effectiveness metrics for projects including measures of stakeholder satisfaction with the communication processes. Lessons learned are analysed to support the processes for continuous enhancements and future reference.

L e

v e

l 5

– O

p ti

m is

in g

P ro

c e

s s

26

Linking Risk & Communication Management

27

Risk Communication Example

29

Complete Risk Register Example (Zoomed in)

30

Group Activity Practice for Assessment 3

31

Risk & Communication

London Olympic Games

Final part…

• With the risk response strategies and activities planned for the identified risks…

• Identify stakeholders to be engaged in the risk management activities.

• Apply communication methods and tools to support the activities.

• Add this information to your Risk Register.

• Present it to class!

Assessments Overview

Assessments Timeframes

Assessment Task Overview Weight Due Date

Assessment 1 – Change Management Plan

Integrated Change Report (Individual Assessment) 40% End of Module 3

(Week 6)

Assessment 2 – Risk and Communication Management

Risk Management Report (Group Assessment) 40% First Half of Module 5

(Week 9)

Assessment 3 – Project Status Reporting

Module 4-5 Discussion Forum (Individual Assessment) 20% First Half of Module 6

(Week 11)

Total for Subject: 100%

34

You will use it for all your Assessments…

Have you had a chance to read it for a discussion?

PROJ6003_Assessment Case Study_The Case of IV Pumps in a Health Care Centre

Case Study

35

Assessment 2

36

Assessment 2 – Task Summary

In this assessment, you will further analyse the case study that was introduced in Assessment

1. You are required to write a group report of 1500 words per student (excluding tables,

figures, graphs) demonstrating your understanding of Risk and Communication Management

by:

• Identifying risks from the given case study and critically analysing their impact on the project

• Using a Probability & Impact Matrix to assess these risks

• Propose response strategies and actions to manage the identified risks

• And identifying how stakeholders will be communicated about the risk management strategy.

A complete Risk Register should also be submitted attached to the report demonstrating how

the team developed and applied this key output of project risk management.

The intention of this assessment is that you take a practical approach by considering that this

risk report will be submitted to key stakeholders of given case study, as well as it allows you to

practice the soft skills required to work effectively in a team. Negotiation of roles and

responsibilities within the group are the responsibility of students.

Please refer to the Task Instructions for details on how to complete this task.

37

Assessment 2 – Groups

38

GROUP No TEAM MEMBERS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Assessment 2 – Key Requirements

The report should encompass a practical approach in addressing the following requirements:

• Risk Identification and Impact Assessment

a) Identify possible risks for the case study and critically analyse the impact of these risks.

b) Use a Risk Probability and Impact matrix to rate and prioritise risks.

c) Develop appropriate response strategies, including a proposed course of action, to

effectively manage each identified risk.

d) Create a complete Risk Register for the case study.

• Risk Management Reporting

e) Identify and explain how stakeholders will be communicated and engaged on the project’s

ongoing risk management activities.

Note: The Learning Facilitator will advise a minimal number of risks to be managed

throughout the report according to the group/class size.

39

Risk Management Process used - Flowchart

Identify risks

Assess risks (P&I)

- P&I Matrix - P&I Matrix Definitions

Develop Risk Responses - Strategy

- Course of Action

Communication with

Stakeholders - Identify

Stakeholders - Communication

Methods - Link with each

Risk

Provide the entire Risk Register

containing all previous steps

Submission Instructions

Only one submission per group is required.

Nominate a group leader within your group and this group leader will submit the

assessment on behalf of the group.

Use the link available on Groups (go to your assigned group and click on Group

Assignment) to submit your assessment. Once a submission within the group has been

completed, this will close off the submission for the rest of the group members.

If opting for submitting directly from the main navigation menu:

Submit Assessment 2 via the Assessment link in the main navigation menu in PROJ6003 –

Project Execution and Control. The Learning Facilitator will provide feedback via the Grade

Centre in the LMS portal. Feedback can be viewed in My Grades.

If submitting more than one document:

Please note during the submission process: If you would like to include appendix items in your

submission, once your first item has been uploaded, click ‘Browse Your Computer’ to attach

your extra documents as an appendix. Then click Final Submit button.

41

Submission of your Assessments 2

▪ There is only ONE submission allowed.

▪ Once you submit the assessment, you cannot resubmit it.

Any Questions or Concerns?

PROJ6003 – PROJECT EXECUTION AND CONTROL

Don’t forget!

I’m here to facilitate your journey, the rest is up to you!

But, when in need, don’t hesitate to contact me via the

Ask the Facilitator Forum or [email protected]

.

Attachment 2

Module 5 Progress and Performance Measurement

Week 11

PROJ6003 – PROJECT EXECUTION AND CONTROL

Dr Ibrahim Abdallah [email protected]

Learning Facilitator

Master of Global Project Management

Today’s Schedule

Review of Project Reporting

Project Health Checks

- What is it

- Difference between Health Check and Audits

- Benefits & Misconceptions

- Warning Signs!

Assessment 3 Q&A

Let’s warm up…

What information can we get from

Project reports? What do we use this information for?

Review of Project Report for Assessment 3

“You may get status reports and you may actually get some that give you a feel for the progress of the project.

But how do you know if you're project is sick or harboring a dangerous silent symptom of a fatal disease?”

(Merla, 2005) 5

Most projects seem to focus on only two metrics: time and cost. In reality

unknown or hidden issues could lead to loss of employment, demotions or project

cancellation.

• Project health checks offer the greatest opportunity for early corrective

action to save a potentially failing project. An objective, non-intrusive and

independent review to identify actionable recommendations.

• A simple process of asking a few questions periodically of the

project manager and the project team members.

One of the key benefits of a Project Health check is that it allows

an opportunity to assess the project without bias and in a way that

cannot usually be performed by someone too close to the project.

Project Health Checks

6

• Health checks can function as an ongoing tool by being performed randomly

when needed or periodically throughout various life-cycle stages.

• There are specific circumstances that indicate that a health check should be

accomplished quickly:

✓ Significant scope creep

✓ Escalating costs accompanied by a deterioration in value and benefits

✓ Schedule slippages that cannot be corrected

✓ Missed deadlines

✓ Poor morale accompanied by changes in key project personnel

Project Health Checks Cont’d

7

Project audit vs Project health checks

8

✓ Work with the stakeholders to establish a routine schedule for health checks

or can be done at random.

✓ Identify conditions where non-routine health checks may be necessary

✓ Establish a set of metrics for performing the health checks – checklist or

process.

✓ Identify whether internal or external personnel will be used for the health

checks

✓ Be honest in reporting the results of the health checks

✓ If necessary, identify recovery plans

Project Health Checks might include…

9

✓ Determining the current status of the project

✓ Identifying problems early enough with sufficient time for corrective action

to be taken

✓ Identifying the critical success factors/critical issues

✓ Identifying lessons learned, best practices and critical success factors that

can be used on future projects

✓ Evaluating compliance to and improvements for the enterprise project

management methodology

Benefits of Project Health Checks

10

✓ Identifying which activities may require or benefit from additional resources

✓ Identifying present and future risk as well as possible risk mitigation

strategies

✓ Determining if the benefits and value will be there at completion

✓ Determining if premature termination is required to put the project out of its

misery

✓ The process can lead to a higher quality of execution and to an

improved success rate

Benefits of Project Health Checks Cont’d

11

• The risk with using internal personnel is that they may have loyalties or

relationships with people on the project team and therefore may not be totally

honest in determining the true status of the project or in deciding who was at

fault.

• Using external consultants is often the better choice as they can deliver:

✓ A multitude of forms, guidelines, templates and checklists used in

other companies and similar projects

✓ A promise of impartiality and confidentiality

✓ A focus on only the facts and hopefully free of politics

✓ An environment where people can speak freely and free from other

day-to-day issues

Who Performs Project Health Checks?

12

✓ The person doing the health check does not

understand the project or the corporate

culture, thus wasting time

✓ The health check is too costly for its value

✓ The health check ties up critical resources

✓ It’s too late to make changes or the nature of

the project may have changed

Misconceptions about Project Health Checks

13

2. Research and discovery of the facts –

asking questions

3. Preparation of the health check report

4. Determine plan of actions,

if needed

1. Review of the key

documents (BC, PC) and the project’s

history

(Merla, 2005)

Project Health Check Lifecycle

14

Areas of investigation

• Performance against baselines

• Ability to meet forecasts

• Benefits and value analyses

• Governance

• Stakeholder involvement

• Risk mitigation

• Contingency planning

Outputs:

• A listing of the issues

• Root-cause analyses

• Gap analysis

• Opportunities for corrective action

• A get-well or fix-it plan

15

• “Instant Amnesia” and “Da Nial Ain’t In Egypt” – People suddenly can’t

remember anything or want to own anything

• Project cost - The proposal writer uses a “magic calculator”, No PERT

estimate (3-point estimate)

• The Lone Ranger Rides Again! – PM working alone with no dedicated

resources

• Arrogance Rules! – Backbiting, arguments, weekly reports and meetings to

satisfy disengaged managers, receiving emails from someone not on your

project telling you how to run your project

• 2 + 2 = 17! – The numbers do not add up even if you use a child’s abacus

Warning Signs found in Project Health Checks

16

• What Risk? There’s No Risk Here! – emotion-based solutions, rejecting

advice, senior managers mark up “reds” to “yellows” and “yellows” to “greens”

on status reports

• Where’s Your Project Plan? – Overemphasis on techniques/tools, not bodies

of knowledge, no project documentation until the last minutes, vague

spreadsheets, not presenting a straight-forward business problem and solution

• Don’t Bother Me with Details – told to “Keep it short”, “Just do it”, “Just get it

done”, existing issues or core problems are not dealt with

Warning Signs found in Project Health Checks

17

Additional content to watch at home…

Assessing the Health of Projects

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OjXoKZr3iI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I54uELDdnZA

3 Ways to Check the Health of Your Projects 18

Assessments Overview

Assessments Timeframes

Assessment Task Overview Weight Due Date

Assessment 1 – Change Management Plan

Integrated Change Report (Individual Assessment) 40% End of Module 3

(Week 6)

Assessment 2 – Risk and Communication Management

Risk Management Report (Group Assessment) 40% First Half of Module 5

(Week 9)

Assessment 3 – Project Status Reporting

Module 4-5 Discussion Forum (Individual Assessment) 20% First Half of Module 6

(Week 11)

Total for Subject: 100%

20

You will use it for all your Assessments…

PROJ6003_Assessment Case Study_The Case of IV Pumps in a Health Care Centre

Case Study

21

Assessment 3

22

Assessment 3 – Task Summary

In this assessment, you will further analyse the case study that was introduced in Assessments 1

and 2. You will participate in the discussion with your classmates demonstrating your

understanding of Project Status reporting by:

• Identifying effective project status reports and discussing their challenges and pitfalls,

• Explaining the difference between the status reports provided for teams, sponsors, and

steering committee considering their unique needs,

• As well as creating and justifying a sample of a status report that would be submitted to a

chosen stakeholder of the project from the given case study.

This assessment allows you to practice professional communication with peers, either face-to-

face or virtually.

Note: At the discretion of the Learning Facilitator, this assessment can be delivered in

class as a presentation/discussion, using recordings or writing directly on the discussion

forum. This might require to initiate the task ahead of the submission deadline and will be

communicate by the Learning Facilitator.

Please refer to the Task Instructions for details on how to complete this task.

23

Assessment 3 – Key Requirements

This assessment can be delivered via a presentation in class (Option 1) or as a discussion on

Blackboard (Option 2), to be advised by the Learning Facilitator based on the group/class

size.

To complete this assessment task, you must:

PART 1

Prepare a script/essay for the main post/presentation to be submitted on the discussion forum

of 850 words (+/-10%) containing:

a) Identify, at least 3, effective status reports used in project management.

b) Discuss challenges and pitfalls of these status reports.

c) Explain the difference between the status reports provided for teams, sponsors, and

steering committee considering their unique needs.

d) Create and justify a sample of a project status report that would be submitted to a

chosen stakeholder of the project from the given case study.

24

Assessment 3 – Key Requirements Cont’d

PART 2

OPTION 1 – Discussion in class – Presentation & Responses

If presenting in class (F2F/Virtual/Online):

You will, then, present your script and respond to at least one (1) other classmate in class.

OPTION 2 – Discussion in writing or as recording on Blackboard – Presentation & Responses

If submitting on the discussion forum – recording/written post (F2F/Virtual/Online):

You will, then, present your script and respond to at least one (1) other classmate on the

discussion forum directly, either in writing or as a recording, as instructed by the Learning

Facilitator.

Please refer to the Task Instructions for details on how to complete this task.

The Learning Facilitator will advise well in advance which will be the option for your

class.

25

Submission Instructions

In submitting the written portion of your Assessment 3, you will use the Assessment link in the

main navigation menu in PROJ6003 – Project Execution and Control.

The link will take you to the discussion forum where you will select the existing thread created

by the Learning Facilitator and reply to the first post by the Learning Facilitator and write

directly on the forum (do not attach files).

The Learning Facilitator will provide feedback via the Grade Centre in the LMS portal.

Feedback can be viewed in My Grades.

If submitting recording/pictures:

If your submission includes items (illustrations, recordings), you may attached them by clicked

to add content and selecting to insert local files, click ‘Browse Your Computer’ to attach your

extra files.

26

Checking your Originality Report

Any Questions or Concerns?

PROJ6003 – PROJECT EXECUTION AND CONTROL

Don’t forget!

I’m here to facilitate your journey, the rest is up to you!

But, when in need, don’t hesitate to contact me via the

Ask the Facilitator Forum or at [email protected]

.

Attachment 3

Module 6 Project Closure

Week 12

PROJ6003 – PROJECT EXECUTION AND CONTROL

Dr Ibrahim Abdallah [email protected]

Learning Facilitator

Master of Global Project Management

Today’s Schedule

Presentations for Assessment 3

Module 6 – What we’ll cover

Project Closing Process Group

Type of project closure

Administrative Closure

Learning for Future Closure

Celebrate success!

KALM retrospective on the subject

What we’ll cover in this Module

▪ Closure of a project or phase and closure of procurements.

▪ Balancing of stakeholders’ and organisational interests at project

closure.

▪ Characteristics of Closing and Project Endings.

4

• The Closing Process Group consists of the

process(es) performed to formally complete or

close a project, phase, or contract.

• This Process Group verifies that the defined

processes are completed within all of the Process

Groups to close the project or phase, as

appropriate, and formally establishes that the

project or project phase is complete.

PMBOK’s Closing Process Group

The key benefit of this Process

Group is that phases, projects, and

contracts are closed out

appropriately.

5

• In this process, the project or phase information are

archived, the planned work is completed, and

organisational team resources are released to pursue

new endeavours.

• This process is performed once or at predefined points

in the project.

• When closing the project, the project manager reviews

the project management plan to ensure that all project

work is completed and that the project has met its

objectives.

PMBOK’s Close Project or Phase

6

Normal or Extinction

• The project has come to an end because it’s fulfilled its

goal successfully.

• Product, service or result was completed to the

satisfaction of the stakeholders and the client has

formally signed off an approval stating that the project

has been completed.

Addition

• When the project evolves into its own business unit.

• It grows until no longer fits to the criteria or description of

a project and can no longer be managed as a project.

Types of Project Closure

7

Premature: Integration or Starvation

• Integration: Losing resources due to redistribution to other projects that have

been assigned a higher priority. Common in Functional organisations where

the primary duties of the resources call them away from the project.

• Starvation: Starting to lack resources that may force a project to close. As a

result of budget cuts or staffing issues, which may bring the project to a

collapse.

Failed Project

• The project has met its “exit criteria” established by the client/sponsor/initiator

Types of Project Closure Cont’d

8

(Richardson, 2014, p. 486)

Project Closing Breakdown Structure

9

K e y C

lo s in

g S

te p s

Administrative closure

To make sure that the project is closed

Ensure all activities planned were carried out according to plan

Project-centric

Check variances and propose adjustments for the remainder of project

Learning for future projects

Beyond the value of the project – Enterprise-Centric

Enable project teams to be more efficient in future

projects and generate more value for the organisation

Foster knowledge sharing

Lessons Learned, Best Practices, Issue resolution tactics

Lessons Learned give your organisation the opportunity to learn and grow with each

new project.

10

•Satisfy completion or exit criteria for the phase or project such as:

▪ Ensure that all documents and deliverables are up-to-date and that all

issues are resolved;

▪ Confirming the delivery and formal acceptance of deliverables by the

customer to prove that the project is complete;

▪ Ensuring that all costs are charged to the project & project accounts are

closed;

▪ Reassigning personnel & Dealing with excess project material (reallocating

facilities, equipment, and other resources);

▪ Transferring the project’s products, services, or results to the next

phase or to production and/or operations;

▪ Elaborating the final project reports as required by organisational

policies.

Actions & Activities for Administrative Closure

11

Project acceptance is the formal

activity undertaken between the

project team and the project

client/initiator/sponsor.

Common elements of

project acceptance are:

Project Acceptance

• Arrange the agenda of the project acceptance

meeting

• Distribute meeting materials

• Run the project acceptance meeting:

• Physical assessment results

• Functional assessment results

• Business assessment results

• Conditions of acceptance

• Rejects

• Record decisions

• Get Sign-off

13

• Avoid last minute disputes

• Facilitate acceptance during closing

• Get agreement from client that project is complete and deliverables are

according to criteria

Why do I need Client Acceptance Procedures?

The criteria is defined in collaboration with the client.

▪Acceptance criteria must be clearly defined

▪Criteria are defined during project initiation and/or planning

The criteria is administered by the project team during final acceptance testing.

14

• Client acceptance will be based upon the project requirements defined in the

contract and follow the formal acceptance procedure.

• But, it is also important take into consideration other steps during the handover:

▪ Develop handover plan & ensure customer acceptance

▪ Collect, index and file all procurement documentation (performance

baselines information, change documentation, payments records, and all

technical documents)

▪ Provide trainings to the client on the utilisation of project products

▪ Ensure the clarification of responsibilities during the handover

▪ Keep project design and development documentation

▪ Ensure the continuous service and maintenance of project products

▪ Finalise payments

Contractual Closure with Client

15

Activities related to the completion of the contractual agreements applicable

to the project or project phase such as:

▪ Confirming the formal acceptance of the seller’s work,

▪ Finalising open claims,

▪ Updating records to reflect final results, and

▪ Archiving such information for future use.

Actions & Activities for Administrative Closure Cont’d

16

• Financial closure refers to completing the project from the project finance and

budget perspective.

• Financial Closure is shutting down any expenditures officially. Meaning,

from this point on, no one should be charging anything to this project anymore.

▪ Project account closure

▪ Specified dates and a formal project account closure procedure:

• At this stage, we need to update any of the final project cost accounting, so we

have an exact list of all that was spent, all that came in, all that went out.

• Financial auditing should be undertaken to ensure all payables and

receivables comply with the laws and enterprise situations.

Financial Closure

17

▪ Composition of a project financial

audit team

▪ Execution of project financial audit

▪ Current financial situations

▪ Financial variations

▪ Explanation and

recommendation

▪ Submit the project financial audit

report

▪ Key elements:

▪ Aim of project financial audit

▪ Information requirements of project

financial audit

▪ Project budget plan

▪ Job log

▪ Contracts signed with external

parties

▪ Procurement policy

▪ Procurement list

▪ Budget execution report

▪ Variation control results

Financial Closure: Financial Audit

18

▪ Collect project or phase records,

▪ Audit project success or failure,

▪ Manage knowledge sharing and transfer,

▪ Identify lessons learned,

▪ Archive project information for future use by the organisation

▪ Measure stakeholder satisfaction,

▪ Collect any suggestions for improving or updating the

policies and procedures of the organisation, and sending them

to the appropriate organisational unit.

Actions & Activities for Learning for Future

19

• It is a review to see how effective the project was managed

and whether the benefits to the organisation were achieved.

• Looks not just if the project delivered an outcome, but rather, if

the project addressed the specific business need intended to

meet.

• Post-implementation review usually involves an independent

party, which can act more objectively in making

determinations about how the project was run.

• It looks at the future of projects in the organisation:

• Helps to avoiding making the same mistakes and

learning how to do it better.

• Ideally, done as soon as the “fire stops burning”.

Post-Implementation or Post-Mortem Review

20

• Conduct a survey or hold a meeting with the project management team to get

feedback on how the project went. These individual answers will help paint a

more comprehensive picture of the project’s performance:

• Ask for openness

• Be objective and focus on improvements

• Document practices and procedures that led to project successes, and make

recommendations for applying them to similar future projects

• Look with hindsight - Pay attention to the "unknowns" of the project that may

have increased risks. Develop a way of looking out for these in future projects

• Be future-focused – the purpose is to focus on the future, not to assign blame

for what happened in the past. This is not the time to focus on any one person

or team

• Identify both positives and negatives lessons.

Getting people involved in the PIR

21

• Define the scope of the review beforehand - Clarify your objectives for the

review, and make your intentions clear (this will better ensure that people share

their experiences openly and honestly).

• Review key documents – This will help you assess the project planning

process, as well as the actual benefits achieved through the project.

• Where possible, use outside people in your review process to get an objective,

unclouded view of the project.

• Use appropriate data collection – by using interviews and surveys.

• Deliver appropriate reports of your findings, and publicise the results.

• Present recommendations to the organisation and the project leaders,

customers and other stakeholders in order to share and apply the best-practice

information in the future.

Key steps of the Post-mortem

22

• Was the project goal achieved?

• Does it do what project team said it would?

• Does it do what the client wanted to do?

• Was the project work by the team done on time, within budget,

and according to specification?

• Was the client satisfied with the project results?

• Was the business value realised?

• Can we take things further, and deliver even bigger benefits?

• What lessons did we learn that we can apply to future projects?

• How well did the team follow the methodology?

• Are users adequately trained and supported?

Some PIR Questions

23

▪ Managers don’t want to know

▪ Managers don’t want to pay the cost

▪ They don’t want to put resources back to what

has been completed

▪ It’s not a high priority / not interested

▪ There’s too much other scheduled work to do

(they have already moved on)

Reasons for not doing a Post-Implementation Audit

24

• Reference for future changes in deliverables.

• Historical record for estimating duration and cost on future

projects, activities, and tasks.

• Training resource for new project managers.

• Input for further training and development of the project team.

• Input for performance evaluation by the functional managers

of the project team members.

Closing is also about Learning, so documenting the project is

very important!

25

• Project Overview Statement

• RBS and all revisions

• Proposal and backup data

• Original and revised project schedules

• Minutes of all project team meetings

Examples of Project Documentation

• Copies of all status reports

• Design documents

• Copies of all change notices

• Copies of all written communications

• Outstanding issues reports

• Final report

• Sample deliverables (if appropriate)

• Client acceptance documents

• Post-implementation audit report

26

• Executive Summary

• Overall success and performance of project

• Organisation and administration of project

• Techniques used to accomplish results

• Strengths and weaknesses of the approach

• Recommendations

• Appendices

• POS

• WBS

• Resource Schedule

• Change Requests

• Final Deliverables

• Other

27

Final Project Report

MEETINGS

Are a key tool used throughout the Closing Process to:

Confirm that the deliverables have been accepted,

Validate that the exit criteria have

been met

Formalise the completion of the

contracts

Evaluate the satisfaction of the stakeholders

Gather lessons learned

Transfer knowledge and information from the project

AND….

30

Celebrate Success!

31

It is the responsibility of both line managers and the project

manager to deal with the emotional reaction of project team

members to maintain their productivity by considering:

▪ The project is only temporary, but the project team

members belong to the enterprise.

▪ It is imperative to keep project team members as part of

the enterprise development strategies and retain the

talents.

▪ Key factors when dismissing the project team:

▪ Develop the plan for project team dismiss

▪ Send project team members back to their functional

departments in a timely manner

Dismiss Project Team

33

And… We are done!

PROJ6003 – PROJECT EXECUTION AND CONTROL

Thank you for your time, your contribution and,

most of all, thank you for letting me be part of your

journey!

If you wish to connect, I’m available at:

[email protected]

Attachment 4

PROJ6003_Assessment_2_Brief_Report_Module 5.1 Page 1 of 6

Task Summary

In this assessment, you will further analyse the case study that was introduced in Assessments 1 and

2. You will participate in the discussion with your classmates demonstrating your understanding of

Project Status reporting by:

Identifying effective project status reports and discussing their challenges and pitfalls, explaining the

difference between the status reports provided for teams, sponsors, and steering committee

considering their unique needs, as well as creating and justifying a sample of a status report that

would be submitted to a chosen stakeholder of the project from the given case study.

This assessment allows you to practice professional communication with peers, either face-to-face

or virtually.

Note: At the discretion of the Learning Facilitator, this assessment can be delivered in class as a

presentation/discussion, using recordings or writing directly on the discussion forum. This might

require to initiate the task ahead of the submission deadline and will be communicate by the

Learning Facilitator.

Please refer to the Task Instructions for details on how to complete this task.

Context

As a Project Manager, you are managing the execution and control of the project, but you are also

ensuring that your stakeholders are aware of the project’s progress with the level of detail that they

need. How would you communicate project progress and status to key stakeholders? How would

you ensure that they have sufficient information to make key decisions and assist you in further

ASSESSMENT 3 BRIEF

Subject Code and Title PROJ6003 - Project Execution and Control

Assessment Project Status Reporting

Module 4-5 Discussion Forum

Individual/Group Individual

Length 1000 words (+/- 10%) or equivalent

Learning Outcomes The Subject Learning Outcomes demonstrated by successful completion of the task below include:

b) Critically reflect on the project leadership and communication skills required to maximise project outcomes in the execution, control and closure phases of projects.

Submission Due by 11:55pm AEST/AEDT Sunday first half of Module 6 (Week 11).

Weighting 20%

Total Marks 100 marks

PROJ6003_Assessment_2_Brief_Report_Module 5.1 Page 2 of 6

progress of your project? This will depend on the stakeholder group, their power and interest and

their communication preferences and requirements.

Task Instructions

To complete this assessment task, you must:

1. Ensure that you have read the given case study and resources from the subject, as all as any

additional research you may find relevant and that will add value to your report. Review your

subject notes, as well the Lecture slides and any other information provided by the Learning

Facilitator in support of this assessment.

Note: At the discretion of the Learning Facilitator, this assessment can be delivered in class as a

presentation/discussion, using recordings or writing directly on the discussion forum. Options of can

be combined to suit class size and schedule.

2. Prepare a script/essay for the main post/presentation to be submitted on the discussion forum

of 850 words (+/-10%) containing:

a) Identify, at least 3, effective status reports used in project management.

b) Discuss challenges and pitfalls of these status reports.

c) Explain the difference between the status reports provided for teams, sponsors, and

steering committee considering their unique needs.

d) Create and justify a sample of a project status report that would be submitted to a chosen

stakeholder of the project from the given case study.

OPTION 1 – Discussion in class – Presentation & Responses

If presenting in class (F2F/Virtual/Online):

3. You will, then, present your script and respond to at least one (1) other classmate in class.

• Students will have between 5-8 minutes to present their script.

• Students can use a number of visual aids to support the presentation.

• Students will provide a response between 2-3 minutes to another classmate’s

presentation.

• Students will be marked for the presentation and response to other classmates in class

and the scripts they have submitted on the forum.

OPTION 2 – Discussion in writing or as recording on Blackboard – Presentation & Responses

If submitting on the discussion forum – recording/written post (F2F/Virtual/Online):

3. You will, then, present your script and respond to at least one (1) other classmate on the

discussion forum directly, either in writing or as a recording, as instructed by the Learning

Facilitator.

a. If submitting a recording:

i. Students will have between 5-8 minutes to present their script.

ii. Students can use a number of visual aids to support the presentation.

iii. Students will response to at least (1) other classmate either in writing (250 words)

or as a recording (2-3 minutes).

iv. Students will be marked for the recording and response to other classmates on the

forum and the scripts they have submitted on the forum.

PROJ6003_Assessment_2_Brief_Report_Module 5.1 Page 3 of 6

b. If submitting only a written discussion:

i. Main post submission will contain 850 words (+/-10%).

ii. At least one (1) responding post to a classmate of 250 words (+/- 10%).

iii. Students will be marked for the main post and response to other classmates.

4. The essay/script should consist of the following structure:

a. A brief Introduction paragraph that will also serve as your statement of purpose for the

discussion—this means that you will tell the reader what you are going to cover in the

discussion.

b. Body paragraphs in which you will cover all four (4) requirements listed above (a to d).

This section will contain the information that is required to demonstrate your

understanding of the case study and key Project Management concepts under

discussion by applying them into your project.

i. Any visual aids – tables/diagrams/illustrations – can be used to support the

discussion.

c. A brief Conclusion paragraph summarising any findings or recommendations from the

discussion.

i. There should not be any new information in the conclusion.

d. A list of References providing every source cited within your report.

i. Only cited sources are listed in the References.

ii. They should be listed alphabetically.

iii. They need to be valid and linked with the topic/content provided within the report.

Referencing

It is essential that you use appropriate APA style for citing and referencing research. Please see more

information on referencing here in the Academic Writing Guide found via the Academic Skills

website.

Submission Instructions

In submitting the written portion of your Assessment 3, you will use the Assessment link in the main

navigation menu in PROJ6003 – Project Execution and Control. The link will take you to the

discussion forum where you will select the existing thread created by the Learning Facilitator and

reply to the first post by the Learning Facilitator and write directly on the forum (do not attach files).

The Learning Facilitator will provide feedback via the Grade Centre in the LMS portal. Feedback can

be viewed in My Grades.

If submitting recording/pictures:

If your submission includes items (illustrations, recordings), you may attached them by clicked to add

content and selecting to insert local files, click ‘Browse Your Computer’ to attach your extra files.

Academic Integrity

All students are responsible for ensuring that all work submitted is their own and is appropriately

referenced and academically written according the Academic Writing Guide. Students also need to

have read and be aware of Torrens University Australia Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure and

subsequent penalties for academic misconduct. These are viewable online.

Students also must keep a copy of all submitted material and any assessment drafts.

PROJ6003_Assessment_2_Brief_Report_Module 5.1 Page 4 of 6

Assessment Rubric

Assessment Attributes

Fail (Yet to achieve minimum

standard)

0-49%

Pass (Functional)

50-64%

Credit (Proficient)

65-74%

Distinction (Advanced)

75-84%

High Distinction (Exceptional)

85-100%

Identify different status reports and critically analyses their challenges and pitfalls Percentage for this criterion = 30%

Fails to contribute to the identification of different status reports and their challenges and pitfalls by:

• Identifying other project reports that are not status reports.

• Critical analysis of their challenges and pitfalls are missing.

• Key components are missing from the discussion.

Demonstrates limited awareness of project status reporting.

• A generic discussion of status reports focused on aspects and not format/use/content – e.g. only based on frequency.

• Challenges and pitfalls are addressed for status reports in general and not specific to the ones identified.

Shows some understanding of project status reporting.

• Provides a discussion of different status reports.

• Challenges and pitfalls are addressed for each specific status reports with minor errors present in the analysis.

Presents a coherent and detailed analysis of project status reports. Well demonstrated capacity to explain status reports and their challenges and pitfalls, including making connections with the case study.

Critically analyses and evaluates project status reports with detailed challenges and pitfalls that are well linked with the case study and its key stakeholders. Contribution is comprehensive and advances the class discussion.

Explain the difference between key stakeholders in regards to their information needs Percentage for this criterion = 20%

Fails to demonstrate knowledge in stakeholders and communication management by:

• Not addressing stakeholders in the discussion.

• Lack of explanation of the differences of each stakeholder.

Limited awareness of stakeholders and communication management principles. Resembles a recall or summary of key ideas. No link between the analysis of stakeholders and the status report suited for them.

Demonstrates awareness of the communication needs and preference of key stakeholders. Link between the analysis of stakeholders and the status report suited for them is ill-developed.

Demonstrates advanced knowledge of the communication needs and preference of key stakeholders. Link between the analysis of stakeholders and the status report suited for them is well-developed.

Demonstrates high level of communication and stakeholder analysis by identifying the uniqueness of each key stakeholder with added insights into how to engage them. Link between the analysis of stakeholders and the status report suited for them is very well- developed, including examples to support discussion.

PROJ6003_Assessment_2_Brief_Report_Module 5.1 Page 5 of 6

Develop and justify a sample project status report for the given case study Percentage for this criterion = 20%

Limited application/recommendat ions based upon analysis. No status report sample is provided.

Resembles a recall or summary of key ideas. Provides a sample status report that is generic and not aligned with the case study or its stakeholders. Little to no justification provided for the sample.

Demonstrates a capacity to explain and apply relevant concepts into the development of the status report. Justification of the report is ill-developed or unclear in regards to the stakeholder of the case study.

Well demonstrated capacity to explain and apply relevant concepts into the development of the status report. Justification of the report is well-developed and aligned with the stakeholder from the case study.

Highly sophisticated and creative application of concepts into the developed of the status reports, including the use of trending software in the field. Justification of the report is very well-developed and presents additional insights that contribute to further learning.

Effective Communication Adheres to structure of report and word count requirements. Appropriate use of terminology, paragraphs, sentence construction, spelling, and grammar. Presents using a range of techniques to engage and sustain audience’s interest.

Specialised language and terminology from Project Management is rarely or inaccurately employed. Meaning is repeatedly obscured by errors in the communication of ideas, including errors in structure, sequence, spelling, grammar, punctuation and/or the acknowledgment of sources. Difficult to understand for audience, no logical/clear structure, poor flow of

Generally employs specialised language and terminology from Project Management with accuracy. Meaning is sometimes difficult to follow. Information, arguments and evidence are structured and sequenced in a way that is not always clear and logical. Some errors are evident in spelling, grammar and/or punctuation. Presentation is sometimes difficult to follow. Information, arguments and evidence are presented in a

Accurately employs specialised language and terminology from Project Management. Meaning is easy to follow. Information, arguments and evidence are structured and sequenced in a way that is clear and logical. Occasional minor errors present in spelling, grammar and/or punctuation. Presentation is easy to follow. Information, arguments and evidence are well presented, mostly

Accurately employs a wide range of specialised language and terminology from Project Management. Engages audience interest. Information, arguments and evidence are structured and sequenced in a way that is, clear and persuasive. Spelling, grammar and punctuation are free from errors. Engages audience interest. Information, arguments and evidence are very well presented; the presentation

Discerningly selects and precisely employs a wide range of specialised language and terminology from Project Management. Engages and sustains audience’s interest. Information, arguments and evidence are insightful, persuasive and expertly presented. Spelling, grammar and punctuation are free from errors. Engages and sustains audience interest. Expertly presented; the presentation is logical,

PROJ6003_Assessment_2_Brief_Report_Module 5.1 Page 6 of 6

Percentage for this criterion = 20%

ideas, argument lacks supporting evidence. Limited use of engaging presentation techniques. (e.g. posture; eye contact; gestures; volume, pitch and pace of voice)

way that is not always clear and logical Sometimes uses engaging presentation techniques (e.g. posture; eye contact; gestures; volume, pitch and pace of voice)

clear flow of ideas and arguments. Uses engaging presentation techniques (e.g. posture; eye contact; gestures; volume, pitch and pace of voice)

is logical, clear and well- supported by evidence. Confidently and consistently uses a range of engaging presentation techniques (e.g. posture; eye contact, expression; gestures; volume, pitch and pace of voice; stance; movement)

persuasive, and well- supported by evidence, demonstrating a clear flow of ideas and arguments. Dynamic, integrated and professional use of a wide range of engaging presentation techniques (e.g. posture; eye contact, expression; gestures; volume, pitch and pace of voice; stance; movement)

Correct citation of key resources and evidence Percentage for this criterion = 10%

Demonstrates inconsistent use of good quality, credible and relevant resources to support and develop ideas. Referencing is omitted or does not resemble APA. Different formats are provided and references don’t align with content.

Demonstrates use of credible and relevant resources to support and develop ideas, but these are not always explicit or well developed. Referencing resembles APA, with frequent or repeated errors. Different formats are provided and references don’t align with content.

Demonstrates use of credible resources to support and develop ideas. Referencing resembles APA, with occasional errors. References align with content.

Demonstrates use of good quality, credible and relevant resources to support and develop arguments and statements. Shows evidence of wide scope within the organisation for sourcing evidence. APA referencing is free from errors. References align with content.

Demonstrates use of high- quality, credible and relevant resources to support and develop arguments and position statements. Shows evidence of wide scope within and without the organisation for sourcing evidence. APA referencing is free from errors. References align with content.