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Human Resources Plan 20-30 pages

Open Posted By: highheaven1 Date: 27/04/2021 High School Rewriting & Paraphrasing

*** The business will be for a Creative Studio Called 757 Local. This studio will specialize in music production and artist development. The studio will also be a place for creatives to gather to conduct photoshoots, networking events and video shots. This studio is a one stop shop for all things creative. 


ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTION 

For this major project you are asked to develop a Human Resource plan/audit. You can think of this as preparing for a new business you want to start, or a review of the business where you currently work, or a review of a friend's business or non-profit. This major project will assist you with the business plan you will need to assemble in the MBA679 Business Plan & Launch course. Therefore, it has added value for you beyond this course.  

Write the narrative and lists under each heading with sufficient detail and specificity that anyone who reads this can work with the document without you and make the HR function work well. For example, please do not use phrases like “We will comply with all EEO legal requirements.” Instead, explain what the legal requirements are and how you intend to ensure they are complied with.

This project is scored using the 'Major Project Rubric (not QEP)'. Please click on the underlined 'Major Project' heading above and review the rubric so that you know how the project will be scored.

The syllabus says that you have 16 hours to complete this project. In addition, you have 6.5 hours of reading available from the 'study' section. Use the reading to research information to assist you with this project.

The length of the document will vary from student to student with an 'average' length estimated at 20-30 pages double-spaced. It can be longer if you would like to use this for your business. Bullet-point lists are acceptable where appropriate to present your points.

The Human Resource Management Plan

Bill Gates has said that Microsoft, which employees 22,000, would become an unimportant company if it lost its 20 best people. That’s why you need to address the issue of how you will attract and retain key employees in any enterprise.

The things that make employees want to come to work for you and stay vary from business to business. Bottom line, however, choosing an employer is a highly personal decision. That’s why it’s crucial to understand the individual needs of your key employees so that you can give them exactly what they want. If you only offer a higher salary to an employee whose most important concern is the option to work at a job offering flexible hours so she can care for an elderly parent, then you probably won’t retain that employee.

Here are some of the commonly overlooked areas in a human resource management plan that actually drive a person’s employment decision:

Salary or hourly compensation – While the business may be your “baby,” and you may be willing to work for sweat equity, your first employee will the business as a paycheck. That means you will have to consider how you will pay them.

Method of compensation payment – will the employee be on payroll, or will you contract with the employee. You need to know the pros and cons of both from the perspective of your business and the employee’s perspective as well

Benefits – Paid holidays and sick leave, health insurance and retirement plans such as a 401(d) are among the key benefits most often listed as desirable by employees.

Compensation – Salary bonuses, stock options, profit sharing and auto mileage allowances are among the most important compensation issues to employees.

Work location – Does the employee have to work in an office, or can he or she work from home and “telecommute” to the office, thereby saving wear and tear on automobiles, and providing greater flexibility in work hours.

Miscellaneous – On-site child care, flexible work hours, paid memberships to business groups or gyms, and holidays off are important considerations as well.

The Human Resource Management section of your business plan should consider and address all of the above issues and describe the inducements you will offer key employees to encourage them to stay. It is also important to explain at what point in time certain HR things can occur. For example, you may have to start someone at an hourly rate when the business first starts, but you may be able to switch them to a salary in nine months after sales reach a certain level. In a small company, an investor is likely to be very leery of a plan that appears to be based on the capabilities of a handful of employees unless the business owner has clearly given a lot of thought to keeping these important workers on board.

The Management Team Section of your Business Plan (IF you are using this HR plan as a part of your final program Business Plan)

Georges Doriot, the father of venture capital and founder of American Research and Development Corporation (the first modern-day venture capital firm), said that he would rather “back an ‘A’ entrepreneur with a ‘B’ idea than a ‘B’ entrepreneur with an ‘A’ idea.” He reasoned that an A team would more easily mold and reshape a B idea into a winning opportunity than a B team could execute an A idea.

The management team section of the business plan is often the section that professional investors read after the executive summary. Thus, it is critical that the plan depict the members responsible for key activities and convey that they are exceptional people with integrity, knowledge, and skills.

The business planning process will help you identify what gaps exist on your team. It is rare that a founding entrepreneur has all the competencies needed to launch a successful business. Research suggests that ventures launched by teams are more likely to become sustainable businesses than those launched by individuals. For a start-up venture, as an example, many sharp businesspeople can identify a customer need, but don’t have the technology background to build a prototype. In these situations, it makes sense to recruit a co-founder—someone who complements your skill set so that together you can fill the gaps on the team.

 For a start-up venture, in most cases, you cannot have a complete team right from the start. It would drain too much cash (presuming you pay them). You need to be strategic and think about the two to five key people you will need to succeed. You also have to anticipate when you will need them. When building your core founding team, identify people that can multitask and are willing to take on lots of duties. Considering how important the team is to your company’s success, you need to present the power of your team as effectively as possible. Provide an introductory paragraph that talks about how the team came together. The subsequent subsections will provide the detail that connects the teams’ skills with the requirements of the business opportunity.

However, if this is a mature business you may well have all the key people in the right positions. In this case, it is best to start by identifying the founding team members and their titles. The key is to convince investors that you have assembled the best team possible and that your team can execute on the brilliant concept you are proposing.

Required sections of the Human Resource Management Plan are below. You may add additional sections you feel are needed for your business or organization.

Cover Page

Table of contents with page numbers

 1. Leader/Founder background information along with information on any other key members of the management team.

2. Description of the business.

3. Mission, Vision, and Guiding Principles (or Ethics Code) for the organization.

4. Locations of the business and specific location that this plan document relates to.

5. Product/service which organization provides (useful if multiple product/service divisions exist).

 6. Position and skill set summary table (fill in key information below). For this project, you do not have to use every position in the organization but you should include at least four.

Type of Employee

Functions – What do they do?

Knowledge – What body of information do they need to do the job? Education?

Skills – What type of manual, verbal, or mental skills do they need to do the job? I.E. Driving a truck, typing, etc.

Abilities – What observable activities do they need to possess to do the job? I.E. Ability to organize work, lead, etc.

7. Position Descriptions. Add additional details and descriptions to the information in the table above to create a position description for each type of employee position identified. You can use the Department of Labor’s job description website for this section of the plan and adapt the descriptions as needed. The website is located at https://www.onetonline.org/  You can also google O*Net and it will take you to the site.

8.   Compensation principles. Explain how you intend to go about determining compensation.

9.  Benefits and indirect compensation. In this section, list the benefits and any indirect compensation you will offer to each type of employee identified in the table above. REMEMBER, if you offer employer paid benefits, they will need to be part of your annual payroll budget contained later in this plan.

10. Hiring and Retaining. Provide details as to the principles and practices you will use to find, select, orient, train/develop, and retain qualified employees. You should address each in at least a paragraph, preferably more.

11. Privacy rules. Describe any legislation to which your business must adhere, and explain how you maintain privacy for both customers and employees as well as the business. This includes company trade secrets, customer information, employee information, credit card numbers, addresses, Social Security numbers, etc. How will you keep data in your computers safe?

12. Safety rules. Describe any legislation (e.g., OSHA) to which your business must adhere, and/or explain how you intend to keep employees safe and provide a safe environment for them to work in. Do not use a generic "we will comply with all safety regulations." 

13. EEO, Sexual Harassment, and Bullying. State your policy and describe the principles used to avoid discrimination including any training. Include reporting procedures for employees who want to report violations. Explain how you intend to watch and monitor for disparate treatment and disparate impact.

14. Performance Reviews. Describe the organization’s principles for employee performance review and explain the process you will use for those reviews (what, when, who, how).

15. Discipline. Explain how you will handle situations of poor performance or possible criminal activity.

16. Telecommuting policy. Explain who is eligible, how they request it, who provides necessary equipment, etc.

17. For USA-based business, explain how you intend to make reasonable accommodation for an employee in compliance with the Americans with Disability Act and the Family Leave Act.

 18. Develop an organization chart and show the number of employees where more than one exists and the reporting relationships.

 19. Develop an annual payroll budget presuming 12 months of salary for exempt employees, 52 weeks payroll at 40 hours for hourly employees (using 2080 hours in one work year). Use the current benefit/taxes the firm has to pay for the location (country/state/city). For the USA this includes FICA, Medicare, unemployment taxes. If you pay a monthly allotment for clothing/uniform, medical insurance, life insurance, etc. please include these as line item expenses.

 20. Create a Gantt Chart identifying when you intend to hire each person during the first year of operation (or during the next 12 months for an existing company).

Please do not hesitate to contact your professor if you have questions.

Category: Mathematics & Physics Subjects: Mathematics Deadline: 24 Hours Budget: $80 - $120 Pages: 2-3 Pages (Short Assignment)

Attachment 1

APA Formatting and Style Guide

Purdue OWL staff

Brought to you in cooperation with the Purdue Online Writing Lab

Welcome to “APA Formatting and Style Guide”. This Power Point Presentation is designed to introduce your students to the basics of APA Formatting and Style Guide. You might want to supplement the presentation with more detailed information posted on Purdue OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

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The American Psychological Association (APA) citation style is the most commonly used format for manuscripts in the social sciences.

APA regulates:

  • Stylistics
  • In-text citations
  • References

What is APA Style?

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed., contains detailed guidelines to formatting a paper in the APA style. APA style is most commonly used for formatting papers in the Social Sciences—business, economics, psychology, sociology, nursing, etc. Updates to APA are posted on the APA website www.apastyle.org. You may also reference the Purdue OWL: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/.

APA format provides writers with a format for cross-referencing their sources--from their parenthetical references to their reference page. This cross-referencing system allows readers to locate the publication information of source material. This is of great value for researchers who may want to locate your sources for their own research projects. The proper use of APA style also shows the credibility of writers; such writers show accountability to their source material. Most importantly, use of APA style can protect writers from plagiarism--the purposeful or accidental use of source material by other writers without giving appropriate credit.

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Personal pronouns where appropriate

  • : “We conducted an experiment…”
  • : “The authors conducted an experiment….”

Active voice rather than passive voice

  • : “We asked participants questions.”
  • : “The participants have been asked questions by the researchers.”

Point of View &Voice

APA format is not limited by the rules of citing the sources- in-text citations and entries in the list of References. It also regulates the stylistics of conveying research.

This slide introduces the basics of APA stylistics related to the point of view and voice in an APA paper, which encourages a writer to use personal pronouns and the active voice. The explanations are provided with examples.

This slide can be supplemented by the relevant section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/15/

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Language in an APA paper should be:

  • Clear: be specific in descriptions and explanations

  • Concise: condense information when you can
  • Plain: use simple, descriptive adjectives and minimize figurative language

Language

This slide explains the APA requirements to language of an APA paper.

Clarity and conciseness are the major concern when reporting research in APA . It is not easy to balance clarity (which requires providing clarification) and conciseness (which requires packing information). To achieve clarity, a writer should avoid vague wording and be specific in descriptions and explanations. To achieve conciseness, a writer should condense information. Because APA format is widely used in science-related papers, the language of APA format is plain and simple. A writer should avoid using metaphors and minimize the use of figurative language, which is typical for creative writing.

This slide can be supplemented by the relevant sections from OWL

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/15/

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/14/

and “Conciseness in academic writing” handout http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/572/01/

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The Literature Review:

  • Summarizes scientific literature on a particular research topic
  • Includes:
  • a title page,
  • introduction, and
  • a list of references

Types of APA Papers

This slide introduces two most commonly used genres in APA format: the literature review and the experimental report (also known as the research article).

The literature review paper, which is the summary of what the scientific literature in the discipline field says about the topic of research, is the genre students likely encounter in their academic studies. The paper includes the title page, introduction and a list of references.

The experimental report or research article provides an account of conducted research. This genre includes the title page, abstract, introduction (which is the review of the published studies on the research topic with the purpose to find the niche for the reported study), method, results, discussion, references, appendices (optional). The experiential report often contains tables and figures. See the slides describing APA format of tables and figures.

This slide can be supplemented by the relevant section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/13/

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The Experimental Report:

  • Describes your experimental research
  • Includes:
  • a title page,
  • abstract,
  • introduction,
  • methods, results, and discussion sections,
  • a list of references,
  • appendices,
  • tables, and
  • figures

Types of APA Papers

This slide introduces two most commonly used genres in APA format: the literature review and the experimental report (also known as the research article).

The literature review paper, which is the summary of what the scientific literature in the discipline field says about the topic of research, is the genre students likely encounter in their academic studies. The paper includes the title page, introduction and a list of references.

The experimental report or research article provides an account of conducted research. This genre includes the title page, abstract, introduction (which is the review of the published studies on the research topic with the purpose to find the niche for the reported study), method, results, discussion, references, appendices (optional). The experiential report often contains tables and figures. See the slides describing APA format of tables and figures.

This slide can be supplemented by the relevant section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/13/

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If your paper fits neither category:

  • Follow the general format

  • Consult the instructor
  • Consult the APA Publication Manual

Types of APA Papers

The general format, which is introduced in the following six slides, regulates formatting papers of any genre students may encounter in their academic studies. For students, consulting the instructor about the specific requirement is the safest policy. For authors of manuscripts prepared for submission to scientific journal, consulting Publication Manual is a must.

This slide can be supplemented by the “Other papers” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/13/

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Your essay should:

  • be typed,
  • double-spaced,
  • have 1” margins,
  • use 10-12pt. Standard font (ex. Times New Roman), and
  • be printed on standard-sized paper (8.5”x 11”)

[Note: If you are writing a manuscript draft, APA suggests using two spaces between sentences to aid readability (see pp.87-88 in the APA manual).]

General APA Format

This slide presents the general format of an APA formatted paper: An essay should be typed and double-spaced on the standard-sized paper (8.5”x11”) with 1” margins on all sides. Times New Roman or similar font in 10-12 pt. size should be used. The document should include a page header indicating a short title of the essay and a page number in the upper right-hand of every page (including the title page).

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Every page of your essay should:

  • Include a page header (Title, all caps) in the upper left-hand corner and
  • the page number in the upper right

General APA Format

This slide presents the general format of an APA formatted paper: An essay should be typed and double-spaced on the standard-sized paper (8.5”x11”) with 1” margins on all sides. Times New Roman or similar font in 10-12 pt. size should be used. The document should include a page header indicating a short title of the essay and a page number in the upper right-hand of every page (including the title page).

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Your essay should

include four major

sections:

References

Main Body

Abstract

Title page

General APA Format

This slide introduces four required part of an APA paper: a title page, abstract, main body (essay itself), and a list of References. An abstract page and list of references are titled as Abstract and Reference, respectively.

It is important to remind students that each page should have a page header with a short title and page number.

This slide can be supplemented by the “General Format” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

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Title:

(in the upper half of the page, centered)

name (no title or degree) + affiliation (university, etc.)

Page header:

(use Insert Page Header)

title flush left + page number flush right.

Title Page

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Page header: do NOT include “Running head:”

Abstract: centered, at the top of the page

Write a 150- to 250- word summary of your paper in an accurate, concise, and specific manner.

Abstract Page

This slide provides a visual example of an abstract page, which consists of a page header, a heading—Abstract, and a brief summary of the paper accurately presenting its contents.

Type the heading –Abstract– centered at the top of the page. Below, type the paragraph of the paper summary (between 150 and 250 words) in block format—without indentation.

The abstract should contain the research topic, research questions, participants, methods, results, data analysis, and conclusions. It may also include possible implications of your research and future work you see connected with your finding, and may include keywords.

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  • Number the first text page as page number 3
  • Type and center the title of the paper at the top of the page
  • Type the text double-spaced with all sections following each other without a break
  • Identify the sources you use in the paper in parenthetical, in-text citations
  • Format tables and figures

Main Body (Text)

This slide provides the basic reminders about formatting the text:

  • Make sure that the first text page is page number 3 (page#1 is a title page, page #2 is an abstract page).
  • Start with typing the essay title centered, at the top of the page.
  • Type the text double-space with all sections following each other without a break. Do not use white space between paragraphs.
  • Create parenthetical in-text citations to identify the sources used in the paper.
  • Format tables and figures.

The following slides introduce APA formatting of references, in-text citations, and tables and figures.

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  • Center the title (References) at the top of the page. Do not bold it.
  • Double-space reference entries
  • Flush left the first line of the entry and indent subsequent lines
  • Order entries alphabetically by the surname of the first author of each work

Reference Page

This slide explains the format and purpose of a references page.

The facilitator may stress that each source referenced within the paper should also appear on the reference page, which appears at the end of the paper.

To create a references page,

  • center the heading—References—at the top of the page;
  • double-space reference entries;
  • flush left the first line of the entry and indent subsequent lines. To use “hanging” feature of “Indent and Space” tab, go to “Paragraph” ”Indentation” choose “Hanging” in the ”Special” box.
  • Order entries alphabetically by the author’s surnames. If a source is anonymous, use its title as an author’s surname.

Note: Unlike MLA, APA is only interested in what they call “recoverable data”—that is, data which other people can find. For example, personal communications such as letters, memos, emails, interviews, and telephone conversations should not be included in the reference list since they are not recoverable by other researchers.

For specific information about entries in the reference list, go to http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/05

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  • Invert authors’ names (last name first followed by initials)
  • EX:“Smith, J.Q.”

  • Capitalize only the first letter of the first word of a title and subtitle, the first word after a colon or a dash in the title, and proper nouns. Do not capitalize the first letter of the second word in a hyphenated compound word.
  • EX: The perfectly formatted paper: How the Purdue OWL saved my essay.

References: Basics

This slide provides basic rules related to creating references entries.

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  • Capitalize all major words in journal titles
  • Italicize titles of longer works such as books and journals
  • Do not italicize, underline, or put quotes around the titles of shorter works such as journal articles or essays in edited collections

References: Basics

This slide provides basic rules related to creating references entries.

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APA is a complex system of citation. When compiling the reference list, the strategy below might be useful:

Identify the type of source:

Is it a book? A journal article? A webpage?

Find a sample citation for this type of source

Check a textbook or the OWL APA Guide: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

“Mirror” the sample

Make sure that the entries are listed in alphabetical order and that the subsequent lines are indented (Recall References: Basics)

Making the Reference List

APA is a complex system of citation, which is time-consuming to learn and difficult to keep in mind. To help students handle the requirements of APA format, this slide introduces a strategy of surviving APA.

The facilitator should stress the importance of correct identification of a type of source: e.g., Is it an article from a newspaper or from a scholarly journal? Hard copy or electronic version?

When the source type is identified correctly, it’s fairly easy to find a sample of a similar reference in the APA chapter of a composition book or in an on-line APA resource. The APA guide on the OWL website is particularly easy to browse since its links are organized by types of sources—scroll down to the box of links http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

After a sample is found, all it takes is to mirror it precisely and arrange entries in the alphabetical order.

Note: Many electronic library databases, e.g. Proquest, have citation feature. The useful strategy is to save and import into a references list citation entries (make sure you choose APA format) while doing literature search. You can always delete later reference entries of the sources you’re not going to use in the paper.

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In-text citations help readers locate the cited source in the References section of the paper.

Whenever you use a source, provide in parenthesis:

  • the author’s name and the date of publication
  • for quotations and close paraphrases, provide the author’s name, date of publication, and a page number

In-text Citation: Basics

This slide explains the basics of in-text citations.

In-text citations help establish credibility of the writer, show respect to someone else’s intellectual property (and consequently, avoid plagiarism). More practically, in-text citations help readers locate the cited source in the references page. Thus, keep the in-text citation brief and make sure that the information provided in the body of the paper should be just enough so that a reader could easily cross-reference the citation with its matching entry on the reference page; i.e., the body of the paper and the in-text citation together contains the author’s name and the year of publication. To avoid plagiarism, also provide a page number (in p.3 / pp.3-5 format) for close paraphrases and quotations.

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When quoting:

  • Introduce the quotation with a signal phrase
  • Include the author’s name, year of publication, and page number
  • Keep the citation brief—do not repeat the information

In-Text Citation:

Quotations

This slide provides explanation and examples of in-text citations with quotations.

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Provide the author’s last name and the year of

publication in parenthesis after a summary or a paraphrase.

In-Text Citation:

Summary or Paraphrase

APA format is not limited by the rules of citing the sources- in-text citations and entries in the list of References. It also regulates the stylistics of conveying research.

This slide introduces the basics of APA stylistics related to the point of view and voice in an APA paper, which encourages a writer to use personal pronouns and the active voice. The explanations are provided with examples.

This slide can be supplemented by the relevant section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/15/

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Include the author’s name in the signal phrase, followed by the year of publication in parenthesis.

In-Text Citation:

Summary or Paraphrase

The following three slides provide instructions and examples of in-text citations with summary/ paraphrase.

The facilitator should emphasize the importance of developing the skills of critical reading (which enables finding main claims in the text), summarizing, and paraphrasing. When paraphrasing or summarizing, the major concern should be fair and accurate representation of the ideas in the source.

This slide can be supplemented by the “Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing” section from OWL

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/01/

and sections on APA in-text citations:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/02

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When including the quotation in a summary/paraphrase, also provide a page number in parenthesis after the quotation:

In-Text Citation:

Summary or Paraphrase

This slide continues explaining formatting in-text citations with summary/ paraphrase.

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Introduce quotations with signal phrases, e.g.:

According to Xavier (2008), “….” (p. 3).

Xavier (2008) argued that “……” (p. 3).

Use such signal verbs such as:

acknowledged, contended, maintained,

responded, reported, argued, concluded, etc.

Use the past tense or the present perfect tense of verbs in signal phrases when they discuss past events.

In-Text Citation:

Signal Words

Acquiring a rich repertoire of signal words and phrases is the key to success in representing others’ ideas in academic writing. This slide provides a few examples of those and reminds that APA requires to use the past or present perfect tense of verbs in signal phrases.

The facilitator might want to point to the chapter in the composition book that introduces and practices signal words.

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When the parenthetical citation includes two or

more works, order them in the same way they appear in the reference list—the author’s name, the year of publication—separated by a semi-colon.

In-Text Citation:

Two or More Works

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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When citing a work with two authors, use

In the signal phrase, use “and” in between the authors’ names

In parenthesis, use “&” between names

In-Text Citation:

Works with Two Authors

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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When citing a work with three to five authors, identify all authors in the signal phrase or in parenthesis.

(Harklau, Siegal, & Losey, 1999)

In subsequent citations, only use the first author's last name followed by "et al." in the signal phrase or in parentheses.

(Harklau et al., 1993)

In-Text Citation:

Works with 3-5 Authors

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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When citing a work with six and more authors, identify the first author’s name followed by “et al.”

Smith et al. (2006) maintained that….

(Smith et al., 2006)

In-Text Citation:

Works with 6+ Authors

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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When citing a work of unknown author:

  • use the source’s full title in the signal phrase
  • cite the first word of the title followed by the year of publication in parenthesis.

According to “Indiana Joins Federal Accountability System” (2008)

OR

(“Indiana,” 2008)

Titles:

Articles and Chapters = “ ”

Books and Reports = italicize

In-Text Citation:

Unknown Author

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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When citing an organization:

  • mention the organization the first time you cite the source in the signal phrase or the parenthetical citation.
  • If the organization has a well-known abbreviation, include the abbreviation in brackets the first time the source is cited and then use only the abbreviation in later citations.

In-Text Citation:

Organization

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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When citing authors with the same last names, use first initials with the last names.

(B. Kachru, 2005; Y. Kachru, 2008)

When citing two or more works by the same author and published in the same year, use lower-case letters (a, b, c) after the year of publication to order the references.

Smith’s (1998a) study of adolescent immigrants…

In-Text Citation:

Same Last Name/Author

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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When citing interviews, letters, e-mails, etc., include the communicator’s name, the fact that it was personal communication, and the date of the communication.

Do not include personal communication in the reference list.

In-Text Citation:

Personal Communication

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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When citing an electronic document, whenever possible, cite it in the author-date style. If electronic source lacks page numbers, locate and identify paragraph number/paragraph heading.

In-Text Citation:

Electronic Sources

This slide explains and exemplifies the specific cases of in-text citations. It might be supplemented with “Author/Authors” section from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/03/

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APA uses a system of five heading levels

APA Headings
Level Format
1 Centered, Boldfaced, Upper & Lowercase Headings
2 Left-aligned, Boldface, Upper & Lowercase Headings
3 Indented, boldface, lowercase heading with a period.
4 Indented, boldface, italicized, lowercase heading with period.
5 Indented, italicized, lowercase heading with a period.

Headings

This slide explains a system of five heading levels in APA. It might be supplemented by the section “APA Headings” from OWL http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/16/

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Here is an example of the five-level heading system:

Headings

Thus, if the article has four sections, some of which have subsection and some of which don’t, use headings depending on the level of subordination. Section headings receive level one format. Subsections receive level two format. Subsections of subsections receive level three format. In APA Style, the Introduction section never gets a heading and headings are not indicated by letters or numbers. Levels of headings will depend upon the length and organization of your paper. Regardless, always begin with level one headings and proceed to level two, etc.

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Label tables with an Arabic numeral and provide a title. The label and title appear on separate lines above the table, flush-left and single-spaced.

Cite a source in a note below the table.

Table 1

Internet users in Europe

Note: The data are adapted from “The European Union and Russia” (2007). Retrieved from http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu

Country Regular Users
France 9 ml

Tables

Tables are a common and often required feature of an APA format (consider, the research article, for example). This slide provides visual guidelines to formatting tables in APA.

The facilitator should point that a table format consists of four elements:

  • The table label—e.g., Table 1
  • The title in italics , both appearing on separate lines above the table, flush-left and single-spaced
  • The table
  • The Citation of the source below the table in the form of Note (see the example on the slide).

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Label figures with an Arabic numeral and provide a title. The label and the title appear on the same line below the figure, flush-left .

You might provide an additional title centered above the figure.

Cite the source below the label and the title.

Figure 1. Internet users in Europe. Adapted from The European Union and Russia: Statistical comparison by Eurostat Statistical Books, 2007, Retrieved from http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu

Figures

Although figures in an APA paper are formatted in a manner which is similar to that of formatting tables, there a few differences.

In particular, the order is the following:

  • You might provide an additional title centered above the figure.
  • The figure
  • The label and title (in italics) on the same line below the figure, flush-left: Figure 1. Internet users in Europe
  • A Citation of the source below the table in the form of Note (see the example on the slide).

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The Purdue OWL: http://owl.english.purdue.edu

The Purdue Writing Lab @ HEAV 226

Composition textbooks

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed.

APA’s website: http://www.apastyle.org

Additional Resources

There are many rules for following APA format, and the facilitator should stress that it is nearly impossible to memorize them all. Students’ best course of action is to utilize the official APA handbook or the APA section in an updated composition textbook as guides for properly using the documentation format. Since the American Psychological Association, a professional group of behavioral and social science professors and instructors, periodically updates the guide, students should be certain that they are using the most current information possible.

There are other resources for finding current information on APA documentation style. The APA web site offers some limited information about recent format changes, especially regarding the documentation of World Wide Web and electronic sources. The Purdue University Writing Lab has a page on APA formatting and documentation style at its web site: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ For quick questions on APA format, students can also call the Writing Lab Grammar Hotline at 494-3723.

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The End

APA Formatting and Style Guide

Brought to you in cooperation with the Purdue Online Writing Lab

Writer and Designer: Jennifer Liethen Kunka

Contributors: Muriel Harris, Karen Bishop, Bryan Kopp, Matthew Mooney, David Neyhart, and Andrew Kunka

Revising Author: Ghada M. Gherwash and Joshua M. Paiz, 2014 Elizabeth Angeli, 2011; Elena Lawrick, 2008; Arielle McKee, 2014

Developed with resources courtesy of the Purdue University Writing Lab

Grant funding courtesy of the Multimedia Instructional Development Center at Purdue University

© Copyright Purdue University, 2000, 2006, 2007, 2008

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Attachment 2

MBA 640 Live Collaboration

Nov. 17th; 8 p.m.

MBA 640 Managing People

Live Collaborate

Major Project 1

Minor Project 2

Minor Project 2: Write a 2250-word essay that you would use in presenting a seminar on one of the following Biblically-based topics/ principles to a group of Christians involved in business:

Compensation principles (salary and wages)

Training and Development

Recruiting and selection of effective employees

Succession Planning

Conflict resolution

You will have five sections – introduction of one of the topics above, three concepts which fall under the topic, and a conclusion.

Expository Essay: requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner

Due April 11th

Major Project 1: Human Resource Plan

Can be for:

A business you want to start or currently own

A business you work for

Consulting with a business/non-profit

Follow format given but you can add things which may be important to your organization. Make sure you address required items.

Major Project 1: HR Plan

Remember:

If you use the same company in your final business plan, you can insert this as your HR plan

The following examples are provided to assist you

Do not use parts of this example in your paper; develop the appropriate language for your “company”

Plan should average around 12 pages single-spaced or 24 double-spaced; possibly with appendixes (if needed)

Must have a table of contents

List references at end of plan

Due April 25th

Section 1: Founding Members or Key Leaders

If you are using this business in MBA679 – start this section by

1. For start-up – Write an executive summary for the founding members. You need to sell an investor of the capabilities of these people to get this business started

OR

2. Established business – provide bios for key personnel. Investors need to have faith in their ability to grow the business. This information can be used in Management Section of your Business Plan in MBA679

Description of Business – Section 2

Where, when and why the business started

History

What they do today

Special accomplishments

The start of “X Company” Technologies dates back to 1900 when “X Company”. “X Company” began manufacturing xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

“X Company” is a world leader in providing good stuff to xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

“X Company” gives back to the community and has been recognized by award of….xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

“X Company” xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx the assembly facility of 5,000 square feet. For more than 50 years, it has grown as a global leader in xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. Today, the corporate headquarters is in xxxxx,

Section 3: Vision, Mission, and Values/Ethics

Statement of Values:

Vision Statement – What does the ideal future look like? Existing one or write one

Harley Davidson—"To fulfill dreams through the experiences of motorcycling."

Mission Statement – What does your company do? Existing one or write one

Smithsonian: The increase and diffusion of knowledge.

Corporate values or guiding principles – Existing ones or write them

Town of Bloomington:

Open and fair governance.

Fiscally sound use of public funds.

Environmental safeguarding through responsible stewardship of our natural resources.

Professionalism and expertise gained through employee enrichment and development.

Sections 4 – 5 Location and Products

4. Location

All “X Companies” are located in……………...[Describe the location of all of business locations]

Business Location for Human Resource Plan

“X Company” operates business in……….

5. Product/Service

a. Products

“X Company" offers a comprehensive lineup of ……………

b. Comprehensive Services

“X Company“ offers the most…………………..

Type Functions Knowledge Skills Abilities
CEO Responsible for successful leadership and management of organization according to Strategic Plan and reports to Board of Directors Postgraduate work in Healthcare Mgmt. Principles, methods, and protocols of planning, developing, implementing and coordinating large complicated functions of community health programs Business judgement, leadership, process improvement, excellent writing and communication skills Plan, organize, direct and monitor diversified, multidisciplinary programs
Medical Director Plan, develop, organize, and direct programs. Lead and evaluate subordinates. Public administration, service evaluation methods Leadership, administrative, excellent writing and communication skills decision making Analyze departmental practices and procedures and policies. Work well with patients.
Assistant Director Provide administrative, program and/or budgetary support. Lead and evaluate subordinates. Policies, procedures, and guidelines Leadership, analytical, writing, excellent writing and communication skills and problem solving Make recommendations for operational improvements; implement and follow through
Chief Financial Officer Plan, prepare, organize, and direct the budget and fiscal services for the Division. Lead and evaluate subordinates. CPA, fiscal reporting, and budgetary principles   Leadership, fiscal data analyzing, and critical thinking Prepare accurate, effective and timely reports, contracts, materials for the Board of Supervisors

Section 6 – Position and Skill set (please use only four positions)

The DOL’s

O*Net now provides

KSA’s for most common jobs – make sure to note they are from O*Net and include it in references

Biomedical Engineer

Section 7 – Job Descriptions (Please use only four positions)

For each key position, write the position description

O*Net has common language job descriptions that you can use.

Example from O*Net for Informatics Nurse:

Design, develop, select, test, implement, and evaluate new or modified informatics solutions, data structures, and decision-support mechanisms to support patients, health care professionals, and their information management and human-computer and human-technology interactions within health care contexts.

Analyze and interpret patient, nursing, or information systems data to improve nursing services.

Apply knowledge of computer science, information science, nursing, and informatics theory to nursing practice, education, administration, or research, in collaboration with other health informatics specialists.

Translate nursing practice information between nurses and systems engineers, analysts, or designers using object-oriented models or other techniques.

Develop strategies, policies or procedures for introducing, evaluating or modifying information technology applied to nursing practice, administration, education, or research. Chemical Engineer: Design chemical plant equipment and devise processes for manufacturing chemicals and products, such as gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics, detergents, cement, paper, and pulp, by applying principles and technology of chemistry, physics, and engineering (O*Net, 2019)

Job Description (Con.)

Nurse Practitioner

Analyze and interpret patients' histories, symptoms, physical findings, or diagnostic information to develop appropriate diagnoses.

Diagnose or treat acute health care problems such as illnesses, infections, or injuries.

Recommend diagnostic or therapeutic interventions with attention to safety, cost, invasiveness, simplicity, acceptability, adherence, and efficacy.

Prescribe medications based on efficacy, safety, and cost as legally authorized.

Educate patients about self-management of acute or chronic illnesses, tailoring instructions to patients' individual circumstances.

From O*Net Website

Section 8 - Compensation Principles

“X Company” maintains salaries that are consistent with industry standards for pay and benefits. Our goal is pay no less than 85% of the location average. We believe that employees are entitled to:

Pay differentials for jobs which are different in skill level, danger, education, etc.; 

Equal pay for equal work

Exempt versus non-exempt

Benefits policies

Who would be eligible and when

Salary reviews will be conducted every XX months by Ms. I. M. Boss….

Section 9 - Compensation and Benefits

List compensation and benefits for each type of employee – Example:

Employees of “X Company” are eligible for many benefits, including health and retirement savings plans, whether in a salaried (exempt) or hourly (non-exempt) positions. Health insurance includes medical, dental, and vision coverage with both a PPO and Health Savings Account option. The retirement benefits include a tax-sheltered 403(b) plan, where “X Company” will match 3% of employee contributions into the account. ALL EMPLOYER PAID BENEFITS MUST BE PART OF THE ANNUAL PAYROLL BUDGET.

The compensation associated with each position is listed below. All positions are salaried, with the exception of xxxxxx positions. Salaried and hourly employees are eligible for 12 sick days per year. Salaried positions start with 3 weeks of vacation per calendar year, while hourly positions start with 2 weeks of vacation per calendar year. Additional leave includes:

 Holidays (8 days)

 Jury Duty Leave

 Military Leave

 Personal Leave

 Health and Dental Insurance (Waiting period: First of the month, following 90 days from hired date)

 Life Insurance (Waiting period: First of the month, following 90 days from hired date)

Salaries:

Senior Executive: $150,000 (salaried)

Vice President of XXXX: $100,000 (salaried)

[List additional key positions and salaries]

Section 10 – Principles and Practices

Each of the topics below should have, as a minimum, a paragraph to support it.

“X Company” utilizes a comprehensive strategy to find, select, hire, orient, train, develop, motivate, and retain qualified employees:

Find: “X Company” hosts quarterly hiring fairs, in addition to posting all job positions on the Human Resources webpage for the xxxxx…

Select: “X Company” requires all HR staff and Hiring Supervisors to complete the Basic Supervisory Training program in order to interview prospective staff members to ensure that new hires possess the relevant skills and qualifications in order to perform the job duties successfully…

Hire: In order to complete the hiring process, “X Company” requires all employees to undergo a background check prior to accepting a job offer, as well as…

Orient: “X Company” requires all employees to undergo a 2-week orientation before beginning their specific job duties to xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. Employees will be provided with access to…

Section 10 – Principles and Practices (con.)

Train: “X Company” requires all employees to undergo a 1-week training period to cover pertinent operating systems, which include …..All employees will attend a for hour anti-discrimination/sexual harassment training during their first month of employment…etc.

Develop: “X Company” offers “just in time” training, leadership workshops, reimbursable tuition, etc. in order to keep our team growing….

Motivate: “X Company” offers incentives for employees that continually meet and exceed Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), such as xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Retain: “X Company” provides a reporting structure xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

NOTE: Your sections should be considerably longer than these short examples.

Section 11- Privacy Rules (Example)

“X Company’ requires that all employees respect the confidence placed in them by fellow employees and by the Company’s clients. The release of the Company and/or customer information, either deliberately or carelessly, could be harmful to the Company and our clients.

“Confidential Information” is any information, process, or idea that is not generally known in the industry. Examples of confidential information include, but are not limited to, the following:

Computer program…

Computer lists…

Product design….

Financial information….

Information regarding current or former employees; including salary or benefit information….

Contents of personnel records...

Information contained in policy, procedure, and training manuals…

Customer files or lists of clients….

The employee understands that the above list is intended to be illustrative rather than comprehensive, and that other confidential information covered by this agreement may currently exist or arise in the future. In the event that an employee is not sure whether certain information is considered confidential within the scope of this agreement, the employee will treat that information as confidential unless informed in writing by “X Company” to the contrary.

Therefore, any Company or customer information not in the public domain that is obtained by an employee is considered confidential. All current and former employees are bound by this confidentiality policy. Anyone who violates this policy may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

Section 12 – Safety rules for industry (Example)

“X COMPANY” strives to provide safe and healthful working conditions for all employees. No one will knowingly be required to work in an unsafe manner. Safety is every employee's responsibility, and everyone is expected to do everything reasonable and necessary to ensure safety.

“X COMPANY” expects all employees to properly use the personal protection equipment we provide. Safety equipment may include safety glasses and hardhats. Employees must attend PPE Safety training. For everyone’s protection, failure to use appropriate safety gear and/or follow our safety procedures may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

Please note that our “X Company” Standard Practice General Policy for Safety is as follows:

“X Company” will comply with appropriate safety, environmental, and security laws and regulations such as those established by: Make sure you use their websites and write relevant information – see next slide

• The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

• The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

• The Department of Transportation (DOT)

• All other applicable Federal, State, and Local Safety and Health Regulations.

DO NOT: Just say “we will comply with OSHA requirements” What are the OSHA requirements?

Don’t forget PPE for

COVID

EXAMPLE: PPE Used with Various Roofing Tools and Equipment (from OSHA)

Nail guns: Wear hearing protection and eye protection. Also use safety devices that prevent the nail gun from discharging unless it is in contact with the work surface. Avoid carrying the nail gun against the body, or with a finger on the trigger, or while connected to the air compressor.

• Generator/air compressor: Wear hearing protection and eye protection while working near the equipment.

• Compressed air: Wear hearing protection and eye protection. Also use a whip check or wire connections to prevent separation. Confirm that the pressure is adjusted appropriately for the tool.

• Shingle stripper (manual): Wear proper footwear and eye protection.

• Power saw: Wear hearing protection, eye protection, and work gloves. Ensure that blades are sharp and that guards are in place and functioning correctly.

• Working near mobile equipment or traffic: Wear high-visibility clothing (e.g., vest).

• Unprotected work at heights 6 feet or greater: Use fall arrest or fall restraint equipment.

• Hazardous substance present: Wear an appropriate respirator1 if permissible dust, mist, or fume levels are exceeded.

Section 13 – Discrimination & Disparate Treatment Policy

Determine and include Federal and State requirements including EEO, Sexual Harassment, Discrimination, etc.

“X Company” is committed to providing a work environment that is free of unlawful discrimination and harassment. To fulfill this commitment, “X Company” maintains an environment in which all employees can pursue their work free from coercion, intimidation, and exploitation, whether by the same sex or the opposite sex.

“Any behavior that creates a hostile or offensive working environment is a form of illegal harassment. It occurs when an individual engages in behavior that is substantial and pervasive and offensive toward another individual and such behavior is based on race, gender, religion, etc.“

Address bullying in this section

Clearly state procedures for Employees to take if they feel that they have experienced or witnessed an incident of sexual or other unlawful harassment within this section such as open-door, formal grievance, hotlines, etc.

Section 14 – Performance Review

Review of employee performance is an on-going process intended to keep employees informed of their performance and establish performance/development goals for the upcoming year.

Example of a Policy:

1. All employees will be evaluated annually, or more often if required,...

2. “X Company” utilizes an electronic evaluation tool for annual appraisals. Managers/supervisors will complete the electronic appraisal for each employee under his/her supervision. The manager/supervisor will meet with each employee to discuss the appraisal, after receiving release from Human Resources to do so.

3. Performance is evaluated on customer value, continuous process improvement, and job description duties using the scale below:

Outstanding

Commendable

Satisfactory

Needs Improvement

Unsatisfactory

4. Supervisors will personally brief employees on the results of their performance appraisals within two working days of evaluation….etc.

5. Upon completion, performance appraisals will be reviewed by Human Resources and by the Executive Team to ensure consistency of evaluations between appraisers.

Section 15: Discipline

How your company will handle:

Poor Performance

Criminal Activity

Violation of EEO or other Policies

Etc.

Section 15: Telecommuting Policy

Definition of telecommuting for your organization

Employee Eligibility – who is eligible? Is there an amount of time they need to work there first?

Position Eligibility – are there certain jobs which cannot work as a telecommuting job/

Types of Arrangements – hours/workweek/split between telecommuting and at work/what hours do they need to be available (i.e. core hours)/must attend certain meetings

Childcare – If children are homeschooled/will company help with daycare costs/provide tutors or other arrangements for children

Equipment/Furnishings/Office Supplies – who provides telecommuting employees with equipment, supplies or office furnishings for their home

Request Process – Process for requesting Telecommuting: form/supervisor/HR/etc.

Other Requirements/Restrictions – i.e. EMPLOYER has the right to cancel or suspend employee telecommuting privileges at any time, for any reason or for no reason.

Section 17 – ADA/FLMA for U.S. Based Companies

Americans with Disabilities Act and Family American Leave Act [Information here needs to comply with the State in which the business operates AND Federal law] – How will your company comply with APA and FLMA? Example of FLMA:

Scope: “X Company” employees working in California.

Purpose: To outline the conditions under which an employee may request time off without pay for a limited period with job protection and no loss off accumulated service, if the employee returns to work.

Eligibility: “X COMPANY” provides up to 12 weeks of unpaid… Write a common language statement based on Federal Law.

This is an example of how State Law impacts this section differently based on where you operate:

Under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (CA-FEHA), no service requirement is necessary for an employee who is disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition. CA-FEHA employees who are disabled from pregnancy/childbirth are eligible to take leave for the period of the actual disability of 6 weeks to a maximum of 4 months with the proper medical certification. The period of leave will be deducted from an employee’s FMLA/CFRA 12-week leave entitlement.

Policy:

A request in writing must be submitted to Human Resources for FMLA/CFRA and/or CA-FEHA leave. The certification forms are available through Human Resources, and a health care provider must complete this form. Anytime an employee expects to be or is absent for more than three (3) consecutive work days as the result of his or her own serious health condition (including pregnancy), the employee will be required to submit a medical certification.

Section 18 – Organizational Chart

Section 19 – Annual Payroll Budget

Include:

Exempt – Salaried

Non-exempt – Hourly

Use 2080 hours in one work year

Benefits and taxes which employer pays for city/state/country

For U.S. includes Social Security and Medicare (FICA), Unemployment (FUTA), etc.

Normally 15.3% of salary spilt between employee and employer (7.65%)

Additional costs: uniforms, insurance, etc.

https://www.template.net/business/budget-templates/sample-payroll-budget/

Annual Payroll Example

Note: The current (2019) FUTA tax rate is 6 percent on the first $7,000 of wages you pay to an employee, according to the IRS. Employers typically receive a credit of 5.4 percent on IRS Form 940, reducing the FUTA rate to 0.6 percent, or $42 per employee per year. 

Section 20 – Gantt Chart w/ Hiring Projection

Jan 2017 Feb 2017 Mar 2017 Apr 2017 May 2017 Jun 2017 Jul 2017
CEO
VP – Ops
Controller
Safety Manager
Quality Control
IT Techs

EXAMPLE ONLY

Please note this is not a complete plan but merely provides examples

Do not plagiarize any portion of these examples

Due: April 25th, 2021

Questions??