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Open Posted By: surajrudrajnv33 Date: 13/04/2021 Graduate Report Writing

Read chapter, write short paragraphs for responses, and find a news article (link) about any of the topics

Category: Mathematics & Physics Subjects: Algebra Deadline: 12 Hours Budget: $120 - $180 Pages: 2-3 Pages (Short Assignment)

Attachment 1

© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Chapter 14

Safety and Security Issues

Images used under license from Shutterstock.com

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Security and Safety Issues

  • The Importance of a Protected Environment
  • Safety and Security Programs: Four-Step Safety and Security Management Method
  • Crimes Against Hospitality Businesses
  • Crisis Management Programs

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

In This Chapter, You Will Learn:

To recognize the responsibility hospitality managers have to protect the safety and security of guests and employees in hospitality operations.

To carry out the procedures needed to limit the potential liability of safety risks and security risks.

To minimize the risk of crimes against your own business operation.

To recognize the need for and benefit of implementing an effective crisis management plan.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Importance of a Protected Environment

  • Legalese:

Safety Programs – Those procedures and activities designed to insure the physical protection and good health of guests and employees.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.1

Mr. and Mrs. Angelo were frequent diners at the Buffet World restaurant, a moderately priced operation that featured an all-you-can-eat lunch and dinner buffet. Jessie Carroll was the manager of the restaurant.

On a busy Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Angelo entered the restaurant, paid for their meal, and were directed to their table by the dining room greeter. As Mrs. Angelo sat down, the wooden dining room chair snapped under her weight. Her neck was injured as she fell on the restaurant's tile floor.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.1

The Angelos sued Buffet World, charging negligence in the operation of the restaurant. Their attorney argued that the normal wear and tear of chairs was a foreseeable event, and thus an inspection program should have been in place. No such program could be shown by the restaurant to have existed.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.1

The attorney for the restaurant countered that Mrs. Angelo was “larger” than the average guest, and therefore Buffet World could not have foreseen that she would be seated in a chair that was not capable of holding her weight. The restaurant's attorney also noted that Buffet World had never experienced a problem like this before.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.1

Is Mrs. Angelo's actual weight a relevant issue in her case against the restaurant?

What evidence could the restaurant have provided to its attorney to demonstrate reasonable care in the inspection of its dining room furniture?

If it were independently owned, who would be responsible for designing and implementing an effective furniture inspection program for Buffet World?

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Importance of a Protected Environment

  • Legalese:

Crisis – An occurrence that holds the potential to jeopardize the health of individuals and or the business.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crisis Management

  • Active shooters
  • Human trafficking
  • Power outages
  • Vandalism
  • Arson / fire
  • Bomb threats
  • Robbery
  • Looting
  • Hurricanes
  • Tornados
  • Earthquakes
  • Floods
  • Snow and Ice
  • Accident / injury
  • Drug overdose
  • Medical emergency
  • Rescue breathing / cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
  • Death / suicide
  • Intense media scrutiny
  • Adversarial governmental agency investigation
  • Civil disturbance

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.2

Wayne Dobinion was the district manager for a franchised quick-service Mexican-style restaurant in a large city. On a Friday night at 11:30 P.M., just after the restaurant locked its front doors to the general public, three masked men entered the store through the unlocked back kitchen door. They demanded that the 19-year old assistant manager on duty at the time turn over all the restaurant's cash.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.2

Nervously, the assistant manager explained that all the cash had been deposited in a safe in the manager's office and that he had no ability to open it.

Angry at their inability to rob the restaurant, the gunmen shot two of the restaurant workers, including the assistant manager, as they fled the restaurant. The assistant manager died from his wounds. The robbery and shootings made that night's local television news.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.2

A lawsuit filed by the assistant manager's parents charged that the restaurant lacked proper alarms and locks on the back door. In addition, they charged that the restaurant owners and the franchise company failed to provide any training to its staff regarding the proper response to an armed robbery. The lawsuit was reported in a front-page article in the local paper.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.2

An investigative reporter from another television station in the city called the restaurant's manager requesting an on-air- interview regarding the training employees receive related to robberies. The manager referred the call to Mr. Dobinion.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.2

What issues will the courts and a jury likely consider as they evaluate the legitimacy of the parent's lawsuit?

What legal position might the franchisor take if it had provided training materials to the local franchisee, but never utilized those materials?

What is the likely outcome if Mr. Dobinion refuses to meet with the investigative reporter? What if Mr. Dobinion has not been trained to do so?

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Advantages of Preplanning

Improved employee morale

Improved management image

Improved employee recruiting effectiveness

Reduced insurance rates

Reduced employee costs

Improved operating ratios

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Advantages of Preplanning

Reduced penalty costs for violations

Support in the event of an accident

Increased guest satisfaction

Marketing advantages

Reduced likelihood of negative press

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Four-Step Safety and Security Management Method

Recognition of threat

Program development (response to threat)

Program implementation

Monitoring of program results

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Recognition of Threat

Areas of Safety and Security Concern

Guests

  • Parking lots
  • Guest rooms
  • Public areas
  • Dining rooms
  • Bars and lounges

Employees

  • Work site safety
  • Workplace violence
  • Worker accidents
  • Employee locker rooms

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Recognition of Threat

Areas of Safety and Security Concern

Property

  • Coatrooms
  • Guestrooms
  • In-room safes
  • Parking lots
  • Safety deposit boxes

Facility Assets

  • Cash and cash equivalents
  • Operating supplies
  • Food inventories
  • Beverage/mini-bar inventories
  • Vending income/equipment
  • Telephone access

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Recognition of Threat

Areas of Safety and Security Concern

All People and Property – Crisis Situations

  • Medical emergency
  • Criminal activity
  • Natural disaster
  • Utility outages

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Program Development

Training for threat prevention

Increased surveillance and/or patrol

Systematic inspections

Modification of facilities

Establishing standard procedures

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Significant Elements of a Hotel Security Program

  • Key controls
  • Effective guestroom lock system
  • Proper and adequate training of security staff
  • Guestroom doors with one-way viewers and chain/latch bars
  • Adequate lighting and ongoing maintenance
  • Perimeter controls

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Significant Elements of a Hotel Security Program

  • Employee background checks
  • Employee education
  • Guest safety education
  • Written security policies and procedures
  • Established responses to incidents and corrective action
  • Liaison with local authorities

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.3

The Commodore Hotel was owned by the First Community Insurance Company and managed by Fieldstone Hospitality Management. After two separate guest assaults occurred on the hotel property, Fieldstone Management approached First Community Insurance with the idea of either installing a closed circuit video camera (CCVC) system in all hallways, or increasing the lighting levels of the hotel's corridors.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.3

First Community Insurance authorized Fieldstone Management to purchase a video surveillance system consisting of six cameras and a central location to view them. The events shown by the cameras were not being recorded.

Late on the evening of February 6, Mrs. Cynthia Larson checked into the Commodore and was assigned a room at the end of one of the hotel's corridors. As she attempted to insert her electronic key card into the door lock, she was assaulted.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.3

Mrs. Larson sued both Fieldstone Management and First Community Insurance, claiming that both companies' failure to monitor their cameras was a direct cause of her assault. In addition, she claimed that the cameras' use was deceptive, in that it gave her a false sense of security. As she stated, “The cameras showed me the hotel cared about my security, and I wanted to stay in a safe location.”

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.3

According to timesheets provided under subpoena by the hotel, an employee was assigned to view the cameras in the central location for an average of two hours per night between the hours of 8:00 P.M. and 6:00 A.M. The assault occurred at a time when no employee was monitoring the cameras.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.3

The attorney for First Community Insurance stated that the company was merely the owner of the hotel, and not responsible for day-to-day management, thus it should not be held responsible for Mrs. Larson's injuries. Fieldstone Management maintained that it too should not be held responsible just because the cameras installed were not monitored at all times.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.3

The presence of the cameras themselves and electronic locks on their guestroom doors demonstrated that the company used reasonable care in the protection of its guests.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.3

Will First Community Insurance be held partially responsible for the actions of Fieldstone Management?

Did Fieldstone Management use reasonable care in the installation and operation of the camera system? Would it matter if the cameras were recording?

What could the hotel owners do in the future to help avoid a similar situation with a guest?

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Safety and Security Programs

  • Legalese:

Interdiction Programs – An arrangement whereby citizens contact police to report suspected criminal activity before a crime is committed.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Program Implementation

  • Safety and Security Departments
  • Safety and Security Guards
  • Safety Committees
  • Law Enforcement Relationships

Regularly scheduled meetings

Neighborhood business watch programs

Property safety and security reviews

Interdiction programs

Training programs

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Establishing an Effective Guestroom Lock Policy

Install an electronic locking system

Train ALL new employees on the procedures used to insure key security

Never announce guestroom numbers out loud

Do not allow the room number to be marked directly on the key

Do not identify the hotel with the key

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Establishing an Effective Guestroom Lock Policy

Do not reissue keys to guests without checking their IDs

Do not issue duplicate keys to anyone except the registered guest

Minimize the number of master keys

Keep a log of all existing masters and submasters keys

Train all managers on duty (MODs) on the procedures to conduct a lock audit. Record the results of any audits performed

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Monitoring Program Results

  • Number of inspections performed
  • Inspection or quality scores
  • Number of incidents reported
  • Dollar amount of losses sustained
  • Number of insurance claims filed
  • Number of lawsuits filed
  • Number of serious or minor accidents
  • Number of lost workdays by employees
  • Insurance premium increases
  • Number of drills or training exercises correctly performed

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.4

Peggi Shulkey managed a commissary for a large cafeteria company. Her facility prepared food products for 75 company restaurants. While her operation did not have a tremendous number of work-related accidents, Ms. Shulkey believed the number of those that did occur could be reduced.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.4

To that end, she formed a safety committee made up of employees and management, and charged them with the task of developing a model program to reduce employee injuries. The committee proposed the six-step plan presented below along with their rationale for each step.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.4

Proper selection of employees.

Since an employee with a drug problem is dangerous, applicants should be required to take a drug test before being hired. The applicant must also execute a continuous authorization for drug testing, which permits the employer to administer a drug test in the event of an accident.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.4

Designation of a Safety/Injury Coordinator.

The safety/injury coordinator will review past accident records and implement programs to reduce situations that may result in accidents. The safety coordinator will maintain a logbook of incidents so each department supervisor can review for incident trends.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.4

Implementation of mandatory safety training.

Each employee will be trained in safety related to his or her job.

Increased awareness of safety.

By implementing programs, games, and posters, employees will be reminded to think intelligently and safely.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.4

Implementation of incentive programs for safety.

To further encourage safety, rewards and incentives will be given to employees who practice safe behavior.

Measurement of results.

To be determined by the general manager.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.4

What specific measurements might Ms. Shulkey use to gauge the effectiveness of the group's plan?

How effective is training likely to be in reducing employee injuries?

Analyze the committee's plan for thoroughness. Are there potential liabilities that still need to be addressed?

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.5

Karin Pelley was employed as a district manager by Ron's Roast Beef, a regional chain of 150 quick-service restaurants serving sandwiches, soups, and soft drinks. Most of the stores were located in shopping mall food courts or strip malls. Ms. Pelley worked out of her home office, traveling to visit her 12 assigned stores on a regular basis.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.5

Ms. Pelley communicated with the corporate office via telephone, and e-mailing through a wireless system in her home using a modem, all of which were installed in her home by Advance Technology, a telecommunications company selected by Ron's Roast Beef to supply telecommunications equipment and services to its employees. As part of its contract with Ron's Roast Beef, Advance Technology serviced the machines used by Ms. Pelley in her daily work.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.5

When Ms. Pelley's modem stopped working one day, she contacted her home office, which then called Advance Technology to request that a Service Technician be dispatched to Ms. Pelley's home. The technician arrived, but in the course of his visit assaulted Ms. Pelley. The technician was later apprehended by the police and convicted of felony assault, his third such conviction in three years.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.5

Ms. Pelley sued Advance Technology claiming negligent hiring. In addition, her attorney submitted a demand letter to Ron's Roast Beef, requesting a $400,000 settlement from the company for negligence in contracting its telecommunications services from Advance Technology. The attorney for Ron's Roast Beef refused to pay the claim stating that:

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.5

  • Ron's had no control over the hiring practices of Advance Technology.
  • Ms. Pelley was prohibited by law from pursuing any injury claim against her employer other than workers' compensation, because the assault occurred in Ms. Pelley's “office.”

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Analyze the Situation 14.5

What responsibility did Ron's Roast Beef have for providing a safe home working environment for Ms. Pelley?

Will Ron's Roast Beef be held liable for the damages suffered by Ms. Pelley? Will Advance Technology be held liable?

What should Ron's do in the future to avoid potential liability in situations such as this?

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crimes Against
Hospitality Businesses

  • Consumer Theft of Services
  • Fraudulent Payment
  • Credit cards
  • Cash
  • Personal checks
  • Internal Theft of Assets
  • Embezzlement
  • Theft of company property

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crimes Against Hospitality Businesses

  • Legalese:

Bond(ing) – An insurance agreement in which the insurer guarantees payment to an employer in the event of financial loss caused by the actions of a specific employee.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Human Trafficking

Sex Trafficking:

  • Pays for room in cash or with pre-paid card
  • Extended stay with few possessions
  • Requests room overlooking parking lot
  • Presence of excessive drugs, alcohol, sex paraphernalia
  • Excessive foot traffic in/out of hotel room
  • Frequently requests new linens, towels, and restocking of fridge
  • Exhibits fearful, anxious, or submissive behavior
  • Dresses inappropriately given the climate

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Human Trafficking

Sex and Labor Trafficking:

  • No control of money, cell phone, or ID
  • Restricted or controlled communications
  • No knowledge of current or past whereabouts
  • Signs of poor hygiene, malnourishment, or fatigue
  • No freedom of movement, constantly monitored

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Human Trafficking

Labor Trafficking:

  • Prevented from taking adequate breaks
  • Doing different work than was contracted
  • Living and working on-site
  • Forced to meet daily quotas
  • Forced to turn over wages
  • Exorbitant fees deducted from paychecks
  • Not paid directly

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Search the Web 14.1

  • Go online to www.gozoe.org
  • Click on LEARN
  • Click on What is Human Trafficking?
  • Describe what human trafficking is in today’s world.
  • How big is this problem in the world? In the U.S.?
  • What are the U.S. government’s efforts to end human trafficking?
  • What government agency oversees the efforts?
  • What can hotels do to help limit human trafficking in hotels?

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crisis Management Programs

  • Legalese:

Emergency Plan – A procedure or series of procedures implemented in response to a crisis.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crisis Management Programs

  • Legalese:

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder – A severe reaction to an event that threatened an individual’s physical or emotional health.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crisis Management Programs

  • Legalese:

Off the record – An oral agreement between a reporter and an interviewee wherein the reporter promises not to quote the interviewee’s comments for publication.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crisis Management Programs

  • Legalese:

Press Release – An announcement made by an organization or individual distributed for use by the media.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Crisis Management Programs

  • Precrisis Planning
  • Emergency Plan Development
  • Emergency Plan Practice
  • Crisis Response
  • Management Response
  • Staff Response
  • Guest Response
  • Media Relations
  • Postcrisis Assessment

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Media Relations

  • Legalese:

Press Release – An announcement made by an organization or individual distributed for use by the media.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Media Relations

Guidelines for Dealing with the Media during a Crisis

Do Not

• Allow any media inside your property during a crisis.

• Speculate on what happened or why it happened.

• Ever release the names of victims; respect their privacy.

• Ever speak off the record. There is no such thing.

• Provide lurid or graphic descriptions of what happened.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Media Relations

Guidelines for Dealing with the Media during a Crisis

Do Not

• Ever reply to a question with “no comment.” If you truly cannot

comment, give the honest reason why you cannot. Legitimate

reasons not to respond to a specific question include:

a. Pending legal investigation

b. Incomplete information

c. Responsibility to respond falls to another (give that person’s name)

• Speak in hotel jargon (e.g., back of the house, 86).

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Media Relations

Guidelines for Dealing with the Media during a Crisis

Do Not

• Be sarcastic or use humor.

• Speak to the media without first preparing a written statement.

• Lie about what happened.

• Allow members of the press to tour your property unescorted.

• Estimate the monetary value of the loss.

• Ask to review the reporter’s notes.

• Allow reporters to bully you.

• Disparage the competition of your hotel.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Media Relations

Guidelines for Dealing with the Media during a Crisis

Do

• Emphasize the company’s concern for the safety of guests and employees. This should be the first thing said to the media.

• Remember that your primary responsibility to the media during a crisis is to provide factual information and to express genuine concern for any crisis victims. But you also have an opportunity to emphasize the positives of your organization even in the face of the crisis. Mention, for example, safety and security efforts in place, training programs implemented that relate to the crisis, and your commitment to cooperate fully with all investigating authorities.

• Respond promptly to every media call.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Media Relations

Guidelines for Dealing with the Media during a Crisis

Do

• Speak clearly and stick to your professional statement.

• Cooperate fully with all law enforcement and government agencies.

• Make sure the general manager or public relations director is

the only spokesperson.

• Maintain a professional appearance and a positive attitude.

• Show sympathy and care for what happened.

• Introduce yourself and give your title.

• Speak calmly and professionally.

• Provide just the facts.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Media Relations

Guidelines for Dealing with the Media during a Crisis

Do

• Inform the corporate office, insurance company, and attorney.

• Temporarily suspend advertising for a period of time appropriate for the crisis endured.

• Refer to technical experts.

• Give all media access to the same information.

• Tell reporters you will update them with information as soon as possible.

• Update your website.

• Monitor press coverage.

• Keep a file on all newspaper articles and video clips.

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© 2017 Stephen C. Barth P.C., Diana S. Barber, JD and John Wiley & Sons, …