Loading...

anybody good in "earth science"

Open Posted By: surajrudrajnv33 Date: 08/09/2020 High School Research Paper Writing

earth science


i need help for this whole class 

Category: Accounting & Finance Subjects: Corporate Finance Deadline: 24 Hours Budget: $80 - $120 Pages: 2-3 Pages (Short Assignment)

Attachment 1

SOE 101: WELCOME TO THE EARTH [PSCI] – FALL 2020 4 CREDITS | NO PREREQUISITES

August 24th – December 18th, 2020

Synchronous lecture:

Section 2: M/W 10.10 - 11.00 | on Zoom Section 3: M/W 1.10 - 2.00 | on Zoom

Section 5: TU/TH 10.35 - 11.25 | on Zoom

Labs: on Zoom, at your scheduled lab time

Each lecture, lab, and walk-in hour Zoom meeting can be accessed through the “Zoom” tab on Blackboard. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Instructor: Dr. Julie Ménard

Office: we will meet exclusively on Zoom

Walk-in Hours: TBD, exclusively on Zoom Email: [email protected]

When communicating via email, please include your lecture and lab sections. You can expect a reply within 2 business days.

Each Teaching Assistant (TA) will have walk-in hours on Zoom throughout the semester.

The schedule is posted on Blackboard. You are encouraged to talk to any and all TAs during their walk-in hours. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Required material

• Electronic device (laptop, tablet, smartphone) for each lecture and lab. You can rent laptops for one semester (cougtech.wsu.edu).

• You must download Zoom to your device. All lectures, labs, and walk-in hours will be on Zoom, and accessible through the “Zoom” tab on Blackboard.

• You must have a working camera and microphone on your device for each lecture and lab. Required course fee: $6.33 (waived this semester) __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Course Overview Earth science helps us realize and better understand trade-­‐offs, therefore critical thinking exercises are designed to help students evaluate pros and cons surrounding issues such as choice of energy supply, and more importantly how that choice of energy supply may impact water and atmosphere quality. Earth science is described as a systems science that looks at the entire system, as directed by the question at hand. Utilizing the frameworks of systems and lecturing, students will explore global, regional and local geologic issues. This course will address the grand challenges of Earth science which include the need to better understand biogeochemical cycles, rock types, climate change, hydrologic cycle, renewable and non-renewable resources. Course objectives will be attained utilizing the following UCORE learning goals for sciences: Scientific literacy; Critical thinking; Quantitative reasoning; Information literacy; Writing and communication. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of Earth science, these goals cannot be attained, or topics described or understood in isolation, therefore the class will build upon many concepts and skills simultaneously. Students will become familiar with Earth science terms, concepts, methods and uncertainty. Students will be required to perform basic research and simple scientific procedures, gather data, organize information, and to then communicate what they have learned through discussion and written work. This process will enhance critical thinking, logic and communications and discussion skills useful to multiple disciplines.

SOE 101 - Fall 2020 Syllabus - Ménard

2

WSU UCORE Learning Goal

Natural Sciences Category Learning Outcomes

Course-level Learning Outcome “At the end of this course, students should be able to…”

Class Topics & Learning Activities

Learning Outcome Assessed by …

Scientific Literacy

Students identify and evaluate the key evidence underlying scientific theories.

Describe key theories and organizing frameworks.

Hazards: location and risk level, preventative measures and consequences. Climate Change: Processes and data analysis. Resources: renewable vs non- renewable resources, their uses and implications. Rock types and plate tectonics.

Weekly Activities during lecture and lab that are interactive, student-centered, and focused on questioning, exploring, and posing explanations.

Students will articulate theories and frameworks through verbal discussion, activity groups in both lab and lecture.

Students demonstrate understanding of key concepts or basic principles in the discipline.

Articulate current Earth science challenges in the context of their impacts on geology, society and the climate.

Hazards: location and risk level, preventative measures and consequences. Climate Change: Processes and data analysis. Resources: renewable vs non- renewable resources, their uses and implications. Rock types and plate tectonics.

Weekly Activities during lecture and lab that are interactive, student-centered, and focused on questioning, exploring, and posing explanations.

In class quizzes and student- centered weekly activities will assess retention and understanding of the material. Attendance and comprehension and application will be assessed with in class questions.

Critical Thinking

Students practice critical evaluation of positions and arguments made about scientific claims.

Describe and evaluate the implications of uncertainty in science and the assessment of risk.

Hazards: location and risk level, preventative measures and consequences. Climate Change: Processes and data analysis. Resources: renewable vs non- renewable resources, their uses and implications. Rock types and plate tectonics.

Weekly Activities during lecture and lab that are interactive, student-centered, and focused on questioning, exploring, and posing explanations.

Lab activities will proved students with various datasets, and lead them through the scientific method to understand the complexities of the topic.

Students are encouraged to develop their own understanding of a topic, utilizing the scientific method. Critical thinking is valued more than getting the correct answer.

Students test hypotheses using appropriate methods involving data collection and analysis, and make valid inferences from results

Observe and analyze the provided information, obtain their own data, and use this to develop an understanding of the geologic process or feature.

Hazards: location and risk level, preventative measures and consequences. Climate Change: Processes and data analysis. Resources: renewable vs non- renewable resources, their uses and implications. Rock types and plate tectonics.

Weekly Activities during lab that are interactive, student-centered, and focused on questioning, exploring, and posing explanations.

Interactive activities in lab will ask students to use specific methods, in order to think through the problem and answer the questions.

SOE 101 - Fall 2020 Syllabus - Ménard

3

Quantitative Reasoning

Students apply quantitative methods and principles to solve scientific problems or explain scientific observations, as appropriate to the course level.

Understand how to read graphs of scientific information and measure, calculate, and compile scientific information

Rock types Water cycle Energy Volcanism lab Earthquake lab Scales and density labs Groundwater lab

Plate Tectonics lab Weekly Activities during lecture and lab that are interactive, student- centered, and focused on questioning, exploring, and posing explanations.

Interactive activities in lab and lecture will ask students to collect and interpret data in group discussions as well as prepare written descriptions and interpretations of that data.

Interactive lab and lecture activities will encourage students to look at worldwide collected data, and to interpret the data using the scientific method.

Information Literacy

Students find, evaluate and use scientific and other information from a variety of sources

Find several reliable sources of information to develop their knowledge and understanding of a scientific process or issue, in order to produce scientifically accurate work.

National Park Brochure research and media project.

Reading comprehension will be assessed with lab activities. Students are shown how to, and encouraged to use library resources to find information pertaining to their group project.

Students receive instruction with feedback for information literacy skills appropriate to lower or upper division expectations and departmental standards

Receive instructions and advice on the quality and reliability of the chosen sources for each assignment.

Writing assignments within the National Park Brochure research and media project.

Each written submission will receive feedback. Lab and lecture activities will receive immediate feedback, the group project submissions will receive feedback within 2 weeks, and before the next assignment is assigned.

Writing and Communicat ion

Students communicate findings effectively in forms appropriate to the discipline

Develop and design simple tools or other formats for integrating Earth processes and limitations into their chosen profession.

Writing assignments and National Park Brochure research and media project.

Through oral and written communication in weekly lab and lecture discussions and assignments, and through a brochure group project, students will develop and present arguments surrounding the pros and cons of potential solutions to geological challenges.

Students produce reasonable amount of writing, appropriate to lower or upper division expectations and departmental standards

Produce written and oral descriptions of their work, thought process, and outcome.

Hazards: location and risk level, preventative measures and consequences. Rock types and plate tectonics. Climate Change: Processes and data analysis. Resources: renewable vs non- renewable resources, their uses and implications. National Parks

Weekly lab activities, and writing assignments within the National Park Brochure research and media project.

Through the weekly lab activities, students will produce written work weekly,

Through the group project, students will produce individual written work four times throughout the semester, and group written work three times throughout the semester.

FIRST YEAR FOCUS: This class is part of WSU’s First-Year Focus Living-Learning Community Program. This means that some of you not only share this course section but also live in the same residence hall(s). Being part of this learning community allows you to connect with each other about course assignments, to study together, and to get to know each other better. I will also offer some activities outside of class to assist you and get to know you as well. All students in this class are welcome to participate in these events, even if you are not living in the same hall.

SOE 101 - Fall 2020 Syllabus - Ménard

4

CLASS POLICIES Student health and safety: In the event that you have gone/are going through a traumatic event, please know that I am here for you, and that I will believe you. The following resources are available to you: If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, DIAL 911 FIRST, AWARE Network: aware.wsu.edu, Cougar Transit: 978 267-7233, WSU Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS): 509 335-2159, Suicide Prevention Hotline: 800 273-8255, Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741, WSU Police: 509 335-8548, Pullman Police (Non-Emergency): 509 332-2521, WSU Office of Civil Rights Compliance & Investigation: 509 335-8288, Alternatives to Violence on the Palouse: 877 334-2887, Pullman 24-Hour Crisis Line: 509 334-1133 Lecture Attendance: Because there is no textbook for this class, lecture attendance is mandatory. We will do in-class activities most weeks, and answer questions throughout every class. All attendance and activity questions will be graded on both participation and accuracy. There will be no lecture attendance make ups unless appropriate documentation is provided beforehand, and with the approval of Dr. Ménard. Lab attendance: Lab attendance is mandatory. There will be no lab make ups, unless appropriate documentation is provided beforehand, and with the approval of your TA. Some of our labs are outside and/or off campus. Please dress accordingly for the weather and be on time to lab. Late work: Late work, including quizzes, exam, writing assignments and labs, will not be accepted. Incomplete Grade Policy: University policy (Acad. Reg. #90) states that Incompletes may only be awarded if: "the student is unable to complete their work on time due to circumstances beyond their control". Incompletes will not be granted unless the student has completed at least 75 % of the class requirements for the semester. Electronics in Class: Students will use cellphones, tablets, or laptops in class within reason. Students will use the technology to engage in the course material, and answer questions throughout lecture. If you use your electronics for purposes unrelated to class, you will be asked to turn them off, and may be asked to leave. You will then be marked as absent, and will not receive any points for the day.

Reasonable accommodations are available for students with a documented disability. If you have a disability and need accommodations to fully participate in this class, please either visit or call your campus Access Center (see contact information listed below) to schedule an appointment. All accommodations MUST be approved through the Access Center of your campus. For more information, contact a Disability Specialist on the Pullman campus: 509-335-3417, Washington Building 217, accesscenter.wsu.edu, [email protected]

Freedom of Expression: Freedom of expression is recognized as one of the essential elements of academic freedom. On a healthy campus, there is respect for the dignity and worth of all members of the campus community and a concern for the rights of others. It is the policy of Washington State University to support and promote the rights of all individuals to express their view and opinions for or against actions or ideas in which they have an interest. The above rights exist in equal measure for each member of the University community. In this classroom we want to promote respectful dialogue. Speech and conduct that disrupts the educational process and creates a hostile environment, as that term is defined in WSU’s non-discrimination policy (Executive Policy 15), is not protected. If concerns arise, the instructor and/or students have the right to consult the WSU’s Office for Equal Opportunity at 509-335-8288 or [email protected]

Academic Honesty and Integrity: Academic integrity is the cornerstone of higher education. As such, all members of the university community share responsibility for maintaining and promoting the principles of integrity in all activities, including academic integrity and honest scholarship. Academic integrity will be strongly enforced in this course. Students who violate WSU’s Academic Integrity Policy (identified in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 504-26-010(3) and -404) will receive a zero on the assignment. A second violation will result in failure of the course and the student will not have the option to withdraw from the course pending an appeal, and will be reported to the Office of Student Conduct. Cheating includes, but is not limited to, plagiarism and unauthorized collaboration as defined in the Standards of Conduct for Students, WAC 504-26-010(3). You need to read and understand all of the definitions of cheating: http://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=504-26-010. If you have any questions about what is and is not allowed in this course, you should ask course instructors before proceeding. If you wish to appeal a faculty member’s decision relating to academic integrity, please use the form available at conduct.wsu.edu. Campus and Classroom safety: Classroom and campus safety are of paramount importance at Washington State University, and are the shared responsibility of the entire campus population. WSU urges students to follow the “Alert, Assess, Act,” protocol for all types of emergencies and the “Run, Hide, Fight” response for an active shooter incident. Remain ALERT (through direct observation or

SOE 101 - Fall 2020 Syllabus - Ménard

5

emergency notification), ASSESS your specific situation, and ACT in the most appropriate way to assure your own safety (and the safety of others if you are able). Please sign up for emergency alerts on your account at MyWSU. For more information on this subject, campus safety, and related topics, please view the FBI’s Run, Hide, Fight video and visit the WSU safety portal. Full details can be found at https://provost.wsu.edu/classroom-safety/

Academic Complaint Procedures (Academic Rule 104): A student having complaints about instruction or grading should attempt to resolve those issues directly with the instructor. If that fails, the student should send an email to the instructor using his or her official WSU email account no later than 20 business days following the end of the semester. This email should briefly outline the complaint and be copied to the chairperson of the academic department. If the complaint is not resolved with the instructor within 20 business days of sending the email, then the student may work directly with the chairperson of the academic department in which the course is offered. The chair’s decision shall be rendered within 20 additional business days. Basic Needs Security: Any student who has difficulty affording groceries or accessing sufficient food to eat every day, or who lacks a safe and stable place to live, and believes this may affect their performance in the course, is urged to contact the Dean of Students for support. Furthermore, please notify the instructor if you are comfortable doing so. This will enable them to provide any resources that they may possess. Office of the Dean of Students: French Administration 122 | Phone: 509-335-5757 | website: https://deanofstudents.wsu.edu/ | email: [email protected] Accommodation for Religious Observances or Activities: Washington State University reasonably accommodates absences allowing for students to take holidays for reasons of faith or conscience or organized activities conducted under the auspices of a religious denomination, church, or religious organization. Reasonable accommodation requires the student to coordinate with the instructor on scheduling examinations or other activities necessary for course completion. Students requesting accommodation must provide written notification within the first two weeks of the beginning of the course and include specific dates for absences. Approved accommodations for absences will not adversely impact student grades. Absence from classes or examinations for religious reasons does not relieve students from responsibility for any part of the course work required during the period of absence. Students who feel they have been treated unfairly in terms of this accommodation may refer to Academic Regulation 104 – Academic Complaint Procedures. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ GRADES: Dr. Ménard and the TAs encourage you to come and talk with us during walk-in hours about any issues or concerns that you may have

with the way your work is evaluated.

Please remember that we can only respond to emails coming from your @wsu.edu email account.

In order for an absence to be excused, you must contact Dr. Ménard and/or your TA as soon as possible and ideally before missing class.

You must provide an explanation for your absence, as well as appropriate documentation.

Dr. Ménard and your TA reserve the right to excuse your absence or not, depending on the situation.

If your absence is excused, you may make up the work you missed within 7 days.

In order to pass the class, an overall 60% average is required, including a minimum of 60% in both lab and lecture.

Both lecture and lab attendance are mandatory: - 6 or more unexcused absences in lecture

and/or - 3 or more unexcused absences in lab

- will result in a failing grade for the entire class

SOE 101 - Fall 2020 Syllabus - Ménard

6

The final letter grade will be determined using the following tables:

Expectations of Student Effort – This is a 4-credit class. Students are expected to spend approximately 8.5 hours per week on this course on average. This includes 3 hours per week in lab and 2.5 hours per week in lecture each, and 3 hours working on reading, homework assignments (labs, writing assignments, project) and exam study.

Exams: There will be 3 exams, including a final exam. They will cover all lecture and lab materials. Each exam will be on open books Blackboard, and will last 2 hours once you start them. There will be a short quiz at the beginning of each lab, regarding the material covered in any of the previous labs. Final Exam: Opens on Blackboard on December 14th at 8:00 AM, and closes on December 17th at 7 PM. There will be no make up opportunity for the final exam. Attendance Points: Each lecture will include questions that will challenge you and your group to apply what you have learned in class and lab to a real-world problem. These questions are worth up to 20 points per week, and will track attendance, comprehension and application of the material. Activity Points: Most weeks will include questions that will challenge you and your group to apply what you have learned throughout the Activity, and will track comprehension and application of the material. There will be up to 2 Activities per week, which will not be announced in advance. You must attend class to participate. Perusall reading points: Each week you will be assigned articles to read and annotate. Access Perusall through Blackboard only, otherwise your points for the assignment will not be recorded. You must make a minimum of 7 comments on each reading. Some readings will be individual, others will be done as a group, where you will discuss the content with your peers. Comments will be graded on their quality and demonstration of critical thinking. Labs: Earth science is about the evolution of Earth, its structures and processes. Labs are designed for hands‐on learning and discovery, data collection and organizing information. Science begins with observation, so many of the labs will be asking you to articulate

Point Structure Points Total Exam 1 75 (1 point per question) Exam 2 75 (1 point per question)

Final Exam 100 (1 point per question) Total exams + final exam Points 250

Lecture Activities (will NOT be announced in advance) Up to 2 per week 180 Lecture Attendance questions Several per week 100

Perusall readings Weekly assignments 140 Total Lecture Points 670

Total National Park Brochure Project 120 Part 1: Individual Writing Assignment 1 - Sources 10 Part 2: Group Writing Assignment 1 - Introduction 10 Part 3: Individual Writing Assignment 2 - Geology 15

Part 4: Group Writing Assignment 2 - Geology Overview 10 Part 5: Individual Writing Assignment 3 - Climate and Future 15

Part 6: Group Writing Assignment 3 - Climate and Future 10 Part 7: Group Writing Assignment 4: Final brochure 20 Part 8: Individual Writing Assignment 4 - Reflection 10

Part 9: Group Assignment 5: Project Presentation 20 Lab Reports 10 points x 14 labs 140 Lab Quizzes 5 points x 14 labs 70

Total Lab Points 330 Total Lecture + Lab Points 1000

A 92.5 -100% A-­‐ 89.5 -92.4 % B+ 85.5-­‐89.4 % B 82.5-­‐85.4 % B-­‐ 79.5-­‐82.4 % C+ 76.5-­‐79.4 % C 72.5-­‐76.4 % C-­‐ 69.5-­‐72.4 % D+ 66.5-­‐69.4 % D 59.5­‐66.4 % F < 59.5 %

SOE 101 - Fall 2020 Syllabus - Ménard

7

observations and to devise questions (hypotheses) about those observations. Because the labs are discovery based, students will be asked to go out on field trips during some of the labs. National Park Brochure Project: Students will be assigned to a group, and that group will be assigned a single National Park that will be the focus of a semester long case study research project concluding in a brochure and oral group presentation. This case study will look at all the major areas of geoscience that will be studied throughout the class, including landforms, plate tectonics, rock types, water, resources, climate, and cultural interest. The project will be a semester long project that is broken up into 9 parts. These writing assignments will reflect your understanding of text and lecture material as well as your own research into the scholarly literature around the National Park Geology and Climate. Five of the assignments will be completed as a group, and four of the assignments will be completed individually. For more specifics on the project, refer to Blackboard. A research example from the WSU libraries will be available on Blackboard. Extra Credit: 4 extra credit opportunities will be offered throughout the semester, worth 5 points each. They will be on Blackboard, and announced 2 weeks before the due date. Copyright (2020) Dr. Julie Menard: This syllabus and all course-related materials, presentations, lectures, etc. are my intellectual property and may be protected by copyright. Selling class notes through commercial note taking services, without my written advance permission, could be viewed as copyright infringement and/or an academic integrity violation, WAC 504-26-010 (3) (a,b,c,i). Further, the use of University electronic resources (e.g., Blackboard) for commercial purposes, including advertising to other students to buy notes, is a violation of WSU’s computer abuses and theft policy (WAC 504-26-218), a violation of WSU’s Electronic Communication policy (EP 4), and may also violate the terms of use for the Blackboard software program.

SOE 101 - Fall 2020 Syllabus - Ménard

8

FALL 2020 SOE 101 Schedule (subject to change)

Week Unit Chapter Lecture Topic* Assessment**

Perusall Readings Due every Friday at 5

PM

Lab Topic Lab Project ‡

1 08/24

1 -

Pale Blue Dot

1- Cosmos

Scientific method, Big Bang, planetary disk

Planetary Formation No lab

2 08/31 Planet formation: terrestrial planets, Gas Giants and their

moons Theories Brochure prep Part 1 assigned

3 09/07 2-Earth's Teenage

Years

Differentiation: why aren't we walking on solid iron? - Moon

and tides Earth history

Plate tectonics, rock types & density

09/07 Part 1 due

4 09/14

A dynamic planet: plate tectonics

Cruising around our Sun: Global Climate

Plate tectonics Igneous rocks and

minerals & WA geology Part 2 in lab

5 09/21

2 -

Earth through

time

3-Plate Tectonics and their Hazards

Mountains Exam 1: Unit 1

09/21 at 8AM to 09/25 at 5 PM

Rock types Sedimentary rocks and minerals & deserts Part 3

assigned

6 09/28 Volcanoes Volcanic activity

Metamorphic rocks and minerals & Mountain

ranges

09/28 Part 3 due

7 10/05 Mass Wasting Earthquakes

and Mass wasting

Volcanoes

8 10/12 4- Geologic

Time

Structures and GeoTime

Geologic time and

Solar System

Earthquakes Part 4 in lab

9 10/19 Planets and Moons of our Solar System Water Structures & Geologic

time Part 5

assigned

10 10/26

3 -

Earth Survival Guide

5-Water and its

Hazards

Tsunamis, floods, contamination

Exam 2: Unit 2 10/26 at 8AM to 10/30 at 5 PM

Resources Groundwater & Streams 10/26 Part 5 due

11 11/02 6- Resources and their hazards

Non-renewable resources Maps Campus rock quest

12 11/09 Renewable resources Evolution Maps (geo + topo) Part 6 in lab

13 11/16 7-Climate Change and its

Hazards, Earth's future

Weather, weather patterns, wildlife

Weather vs climate Paleo-climates & fossils

Part 7 in lab Part 8

assigned

14 11/23 Thanksgiving break

15 11/30 What's next for Earth? Future of our planet Climate change &

Earth's future 11/30 Part 8

due

16 12/07 Review Review Project Presentations Project Presentations

17 12/14

Final Exam

opens on 12/14 at 8 AM and closes on 12/17 at 7 PM

Final Exam - Cumulative

*: Lectures will be synchronous on MW (Sections 2&3) and TuTh (Section 5). **: All exams will be on Blackboard. They will be open documents, not proctored. Once you start, you will have 2 hours to complete each exam. Days and times in the table indicate when exams become available, and when they are due. ‡: All students must participate equally in their group projects to receive points for these projects. Each individual Part is due on Blackboard by 5 PM of that day. Each group Part is due on Blackboard before leaving lab. Late work will not be accepted. Please make sure to contact your instructor and TA immediately if you are having trouble keeping up with the material and/or

the workload. We cannot help you if you do not contact us.

  • FIRST YEAR FOCUS:
  • This class is part of WSU’s First-Year Focus Living-Learning Community Program. This means that some of you not only share this course section but also live in the same residence hall(s). Being part of this learning community allows you to connect wit...
  • CLASS POLICIES
  • GRADES: