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Visual Analysis PowerPoint Project

Open Posted By: ahmad8858 Date: 05/03/2021 High School Essay Writing

I need do this project, It aim to introduce a painting and the style, period of it, and compare with it with other piece from the period 

Category: Mathematics & Physics Subjects: Algebra Deadline: 24 Hours Budget: $80 - $120 Pages: 2-3 Pages (Short Assignment)

Attachment 1

ART HISTORY 132

Early Renaissance:

Italian Painting

© Joel Hollander, Ph.D., 2020

1

Republic of Florence

Florence est. in 59 BCE by Julius Caesar

fifteen old aristocratic families moved to Florence between 1000 and 1100 CE

12th century: prospered through extensive trade w/ foreign countries

13th century; barely able to maintain peace between competing socio-economic factions

intro of new gold coin (florin) c. 1250

became dominant trade coin of W. Europe for large scale transactions

Bubonic Plague (1347-48)

economic downturn took its toll on Florentine city-state

ensuing collapse of feudal system

Ciompi Revolt (1378-1382)

discontented wool workers

established revolutionary commune

wealthier classes crushed rebellion

The Medicis

bank est. by Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici in 1397

Cosimo de' Medici 

"first among equals" rather than autocrat

de facto ruler until exiled to Venice in 1433

next year, people of F overturned CM's exile in democratic vote

patronage transformed Florence into epitome of Renaissance city

ancient manuscripts bequeathed to Cosimo by leading humanist scholar

political crisis of 1458

M's opponents ruined by cost of wars w/ Milan

acquired properties at bargain prices

opposition demand political reforms

M response w/ threats of force

exiled opponents of regime

introduced open vote in councils

The Medicis (cont.)

Lorenzo de’ Medici (1449-1492)

grandson of Cosimo; greatest artistic patron of Renaissance

Verrocchio, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Ghirlandaio, & Michelangelo (who lived w/ Medicis for 3 years)

Pazzi conspiracy (1478)

unsuccessful coup; conspirators violently executed

scheme supported by Archbishop of Pisa; also executed

Pope Sixtus excommunicated everyone in Florence & sent delegation to arrest LM

populace refused to resign LM

war followed, lasting two years

LM diplomatically secured peace

succeeded by son

The Medicis (cont.)

Lorenzo de’ Medici (cont.)

started collection of books that became Medici Library

large numbers of Classical works

large workshop to copy books and disseminate content across Europe

supported Humanism 

circle of scholarly friends who studied Greek philosophers

attempted to merge ideas of Plato w/ Christianity (“Neo-Platonism”)

diplomatic efforts

commission of Ghirlandaio, Botticelli, & Perugino to paint murals in Sistine Chapel

sealed alliance between Lorenzo and Pope Sixtus IV

Humanism

definition: cultural/educational reform during Renaissance

revived interest in ancient Greek/Roman thought

rejects medieval mysticism

aims: civic & spiritual

virtuous & prudent actions

common good & individual nobility

conjunction of faith & reason

curricula: revival of classical liberal arts

grammar, rhetoric, history, poetry and moral philosophy

study of ancient republican models of gov’t

themes: Christianity infused w/ Classical (pagan) culture  Neo-Platonism

scope: spread through W. and North Europe

many upper classes received Humanist educations

many high Church officials were Humanists

6

Masaccio (1401-1428?)

biography:

father  notary

mother  daughter of an innkeeper

grew up near Florence

training: no evidence of M's artistic education

Renaissance painters traditionally began apprenticeship at age of 12

moved to Florence to receive training

joined painters guild in 1422

significance: 1st great painter of Quattrocento

according to Vasari, M best of his generation at recreating

lifelike figures (nudes) & movement

three-dimensional volumes

foreshortening

linear perspective

aerial perspective & vanishing point

7

Masaccio

Brancacci Chapel (c. 1425)

function: private chapel

narratives: OT (Adam & Eve) + obscure NT stories (St. Peter)

composition: registered

two (2) horizontal cycles of narrative extend around chapel

stylistic source: Giotto’s Arena Chapel

figures  large, heavy, and solid

emotions  faces and gestures

differences from Giotto:

M uses linear and atmospheric perspective, directional light, and chiaroscuro

effect: even more convincingly lifelike than 14th predecessor

8

Masaccio’s Italian Early Renaissance Tribute Money (c. 1425)

9

(Left) Polykleitos’ Classical Greek Spearbearer (c. 450 BCE) vs. (right) detail from Masaccio’s Italian Early Renaissance Tribute Money (c. 1425 CE)

Masaccio

Brancacci Chapel (cont.)

Expulsion from Paradise

subject: OT (Adam & Eve)

narrative: assisted by gestures & facial expressions

composition: dynamic

diagonal arrangement of forms & gestures

foreshortening (torso, forearm)

sweeping movement of angel’s drapery

compliments strict verticality

color: vibrant

light/shadow: chiaroscuro

figures: solidly modeled; nude

perspective: linear (e.g., gate) & aerial

11

(Left) detail of Adam & Eve from van Eyck’s Flemish Early Renaissance Ghent Altarpiece (c. 1425) vs. (right) Masaccio’s Italian Early Renaissance Expulsion (c. 1425)

12

Masaccio

Holy Trinity (1425)

figures:

God the Father

dove of Holy Spirit

Jesus (the Son)

Madonna/St. John Baptist

donors (kneeling)

narrative: directed by gestures

M  instructing about C’s death

see skeleton below

composition: stable  CVA & tri- format

color: primary red & blue; muted tones

light/shadow: est. volume on figures

issue: Humanism  classical architecture

linear perspective:

square stone vaulting

steps leading to niche

vanishing point: implied horizon of J’s outstretched arms

13

Piero della Francesca (1420-1492)

Resurrection (1463)

narrative tone: stoic (Classical)

figures: idealized

mathematical proportions

lean musculature

composition: stable

CVA

implicit triangular format

frieze-like arrangement (Classical)

color: pastel & compliments

light/shadow: even distribution

perspective:

foreshortening

linear  implied (trees)

atmospheric  sky/clouds

14

Sandro Botticelli (1445-1510)

patron: Lorenzo de’ Medici

career: covered in Vasari’s Lives, but reputation suffered posthumously until late 19th century

apprenticed to Fra Filippo Lippi  one of top Florentine painters

influenced by Masaccio’s monumental figures

commissions: included side panel in Sistine Chapel (1481-82)

three (3) of original fourteen (14) large scenes

Humanist copy of classical Arch of Constantine (Rome)

mythological subjects: c. 1480s

very large scale

classical mythology (see Humanism)

divine love as important place as Christianity (see Neo-Platonism)

Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus (c. 1485)

16

(Left) Botticelli’s Italian Early Ren. Birth of Venus (c. 1475 CE) vs. Praxitele’s Greek Late Classical Aphrodite (c. 350 BCE)

17

Botticelli’s Venus and Mars (c. 1485)

18

(Left) detail of Venus from Botticelli’s Venus and Mars (c. 1485) vs. Greek Classical “Dionysius” from pediment of Parthenon (c. 450 BCE)

(Left) detail of Venus from Botticelli’s Venus and Mars (c. 1485) vs. (right) Apotheosis of Antoninus Pius and Faustina, pedestal of Column of Antoninus Pius, Rome (c. 161 CE)

(Top) detail of Mars from Botticelli’s Venus and Mars (c. 1485) vs. (bottom) Greek Archaic “Dying Warrior” pediment sculpture from Temple of Aphaia (c. 500 BCE)

Domenico Ghirlandaio (1449-1494)

Giovanna Tornabuoni (c. 1490)

subject: noblewoman (aristocrat)

theme: wealth, status, and piety

meaning: memorial; died in childbirth

pose: profile

facial features: idealized

color: vibrant

decorativeness: patterns of clothing

light/shadow: near absence of shadow flattens volume

iconography: Humanist & religious

epitaph quotes ancient Roman poet

coral necklace (rosary) & brooch

partly closed prayer book

handkerchief

perspective: limited to linear (windowsill)

22

(Left) Ghirlandaio’s Italian Early Ren. Giovanna Tornabuoni (c. 1475) vs. (right) Leonardo’s High Renaissance La Bella Principessa (c. 1500)

23

Ghirlandaio

Old Man and Grandson (1490)

narrative: emotional qualities beyond traditional portraiture

theme: virtue vs. external appearances

figures: range of qualities of naturalism

old man  realistic & grotesque

child  idealized

composition: dynamic

color: vibrant & muted

light/shadow: even distribution on figures

perspective: combines

linear  architecture (windowsill), winding road & stream emptying into lake

aerial  distant, faint landscape

24

Andrea Mantegna (1431-1506)

biography: born in Venice

training: Squarcione (Padua)

as many as 137 painters passed through S's school; famous all over Italy

context: Humanism

fanatic for ancient Rome; traveled in Italy and perhaps Greece

amassed antique statues, reliefs, vases, etc. & drawings from them

aim: optical illusion & perspective

not always mathematically correct

attained astonishing effect

approach: fundamentally sculptural means to painting

(Left) Polykleitos’ Classical Greek Doryphoros (c. 450 BCE) vs. (right) Mantegna’s Italian Early Renaissance Martyrdom of St. Sebastian (c. 1475 CE)

Mantegna

Lamentation (1490)

narrative: portrays body of Christ lying face upward on marble slab

watched over by VM, St. John Baptist, and Mary Magdalene

weeping for His death

usually shows more contact between mourners and body

severely cropped

quality of naturalism: realistic

enhanced by extreme perspective 

“wet” drapery: wet (Classical)

foreshortening 

dramatizes recumbent figure

emphasizes anatomical details (thorax/chest)

color: muted

light/shadow: dramatic modelling

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 2: Map of late 15th century Italy.

Slide 3: 15th century Florin gold coins from Florence, Italy.

Slide 4: Portrait of Lorenzo Medici the Great by Agnolo di Cosimo.

Slide 5: Detail of MICHELANGELO’s staircase in Medici [Laurentian] Library, Florence, Italy.

Slide 6: HOLBEIN, Hans the Younger. Portrait of Erasmus (1523), Oil on canvas, National Gallery, London.

Slide 7: Detail of MASACCIO’s self-portrait from St. Peter Raising the Son of Theophilus and St. Peter Enthroned as First Bishop of Antioch, Brancacci Chapel, S. Maria del Carmine, Florence.

Slide 8: MASACCIO. View of left wall of Brancacci Chapel (1426- 27), 255 x 598 cm., Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence.

28

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 9: MASACCIO. The Tribute Money (1426-27), left wall of Brancacci Chapel.

Slide 10: (Left) POLYKLEITOS’ Classical Greek Spearbearer (c. 450 BCE); and (right) detail from Masaccio’s Italian Early Renaissance Tribute Money (c. 1425 CE)

Slide 11: MASACCIO. The Expulsion (1426-27), left wall of Brancacci Chapel.

Slide 12: (Left) detail of Adam & Eve from van Eyck’s Flemish Early Ren. Ghent Altarpiece (c. 1425); and (right) Masaccio’s Italian Early Ren. Expulsion (c. 1425)

Slide 13: MASACCIO. Holy Trinity (c. 1425), Fresco, 22’ x 11’, Santa Maria Novella, Florence.

Slide 14: DELLA FRANCESCA, Piero. Resurrection (1463), mural in fresco and tempera, 225 x 200 cm, Museo Civico, Sansepolcro, Italy.

29

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 15: Detail of probable self-portrait from Sandro BOTTICELLI’s Adoration of the Magi (1475), Tempera on panel, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence.

Slide 16: BOTTICELLI, Sandro. The Birth of Venus (c. 1485), Tempera on canvas, approx. 5’8” x 9’1”, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence.

Slide 17: (Left) BOTTICELLI’s Italian Early Renaissance Birth of Venus (c. 1485 CE); and (right) PRAXITELE’s Greek Late Classical Aphrodite (c. 350 BCE).

Slide 18: BOTTICELLI, Sandro. Venus and Mars (1483), Tempera on wood, 69 x 173,5 cm, National Gallery, London.

Slide 19: (Left) detail of Venus from Botticelli’s Venus and Mars (c. 1485); and Greek Classical “Dionysius” from pediment of Parthenon (c. 450 BCE)

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 20: (Left) detail of Venus from Botticelli’s Venus and Mars (c. 1485); and (right) Apotheosis of Antoninus Pius and Faustina, pedestal of Column of Antoninus Pius, Rome (c. 161 CE)

Slide 21: (Top) detail of Mars from Botticelli’s Venus and Mars (c. 1485); and (bottom) Greek Archaic “Dying Warrior” pediment sculpture from Temple of Aphaia (c. 500 BCE)

Slide 22: GHIRLANDAIO. Giovanna Tornabuoni (1488), Oil and tempera on wood, 2’6” x 1’8”, Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Madrid, SP.

Slide 23: (Left) Ghirlandaio’s Italian Early Renaissance Giovanna Tornabuoni (c. 1475); and (right) Leonardo’s High Renaissance La Bella Principessa (c. 1500)

Slide 24: GHIRLANDAIO. An Old Man and His Grandson (1490), Tempera on wood, 62 x 46 cm., Musée du Louvre, Paris.

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 25: MANTEGNA, Andrea. St. Sebastian (1480), fresco, Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Slide 26: (Left) Polykleitos’ Classical Greek Doryphoros (c. 450 BCE); and (right) Mantegna’s Italian Early Renaissance Martyrdom of St. Sebastian (c. 1475 CE)

Slide 27: MANTEGNA, Andrea. The Lamentation over the Dead Christ (1490), Tempera on canvas, 68x81 cm, Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan.

Attachment 2

ART HISTORY 132

High Renaissance: Painting

Michelangelo

Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564)

biography:

distinguished Florentine family

lived as child in Palazzo Medici

home of Florentine ruler; ripe w/ Humanist ideas

also an art school w/ celebrated collection of classical works of art

style: characteristics (painting)

strong contour (line) defines boundary of forms

color: vibrant, & complimentary

brushwork: vigorous

musculature: hyper-exaggerated

extensive use of “foreshortening”

proportionately contracting in depth

creates illusion of projection or extension in space

Michelangelo

Sistine Chapel (1508-1512)

site: large Papal Chapel built w/in Vatican between 1477-1480 by Pope Sixtus IV

patron: Pope Julius II

"warrior pope"

Undertook aggressive campaign for political control to unite Italy under leadership of the Church

decorative program: architectural framework painted (“faux”)

spandrels  curved triangles

ribbed vaulting

program:

nine (9) OT  ceiling

Last Judgment (NT)  east wall

View of Michelangelo’s decorative program of frescos on the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel (1508-1512)

Detail from Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam in Sistine Chapel

Detail from Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam in Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam in Sistine Chapel (c. 1500 CE) vs. Apotheosis of Antoninus Pius and Faustina, pedestal of Column of Antoninus Pius, Rome (c. 161 CE)

(Left) Detail of Adam from Creation of Adam in Sistine Chapel (c. 1500 CE) vs. (right) Dionysos from east pediment of the Parthenon, Acropolis (c. 450 BCE)

Michelangelo’s Expulsion (c. 1500) in Sistine Chapel

(Left) detail from MICHELANGELO’s High Ren. Expulsion (c. 1500) vs. (right) MASACCIO’s Italian Early Ren. Expulsion (c. 1425)

Michelangelo

Sistine Chapel

Last Judgment (1536-1541)

context: political

Protestant Reformation

Sack of Rome

mood: somber & turbulent

narrative: NT combined w/ Humanist references (e.g., Charon/Hades)

composition: dynamic commotion

loosely arranged into registers

anchored along CVA by placement of divinity

color: vibrant

perspective: aerial

Michelangelo’s High Renaissance Last Judgment (1500) vs. Giotto’s Gothic Last Judgment (c. 1300)

Detail from Michelangelo’s Last Judgment in Sistine Chapel

Details of Hades from Michelangelo’s Last Judgment in Sistine Chapel

(Left) Details of Hades from Michelangelo’s High Renaissance Last Judgment in Sistine Chapel (c. 1525-50 CE) vs. (right) detail from Giotto’s Gothic Last Judgment (c. 1300 CE) in Arena Chapel

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 2: Portrait of Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni.

Slide 3: Interior view of Sistine Chapel at the Vatican, Rome.

Slide 4: View of Michelangelo’s decorative program of frescos on the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel (1508-1512)

Slide 5: MICHELANGELO. Creation of Adam (c. 1510), Sistine Chapel, Vatican, Rome.

Slide 6: Detail, God the Father, MICHELANGELO’s Creation of Adam (c. 1510).

Slide 7: (Left) Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam in Sistine Chapel (c. 1500 CE); and (right) Apotheosis of Antoninus Pius and Faustina, pedestal of Column of Antoninus Pius, Rome

(c. 161 CE)

Slide 8: (Left) Detail of Adam from Creation of Adam in Sistine Chapel (c. 1500 CE); and (right) Dionysos from east pediment of the Parthenon, Acropolis (c. 450 BCE)

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 9: MICHELANGELO. Fall of Man (c. 1510), Sistine Chapel, Vatican, Rome, Italy.

Slide 10: (Left) detail from MICHELANGELO’s Fall of Man (c. 1510); versus (right) MASACCIO’s The Expulsion from Paradise, (c. 1425)

Slide 11: MICHELANGELO. The Last Judgment (c. 1535-40), Sistine Chapel, Vatican, Rome.

Slide 12: Comparison of (left) MICHELANGELO’s Last Judgment; and (right) GIOTTO’s Gothic Last Judgment (c. 1300).

Slide 13: Detail from MICHELANGELO’s The Last Judgment of detail of Christ and upper register.

Slide 14: Detail (left) from MICHELANGELO’s The Last Judgment of demon from Hell and (right) detail of the Damned.

Attachment 3

ART HISTORY 132

High Renaissance: Italian Painting

Raphael

(1483-1520)

Raphael (c. 1483-1520)

biography: father had been court painter to Duke of Urbino

training: workshop of Perugino

significance: most complete expression of High Ren ideal of harmony

techniques: synthesizes lessons of Leonardo & Michelangelo

linear & aerial perspective

strong contour lines

colorism

graceful figures

Christian and Humanist (re: mythological) themes

Raphael

Marriage of the Virgin (1504)

subject matter: NT

figures: idealized

poses: contrapposto

composition: stable

color: vibrant

light/shadow: directed

perspective: combines linear & aerial

vanishing point

unlike Perugino, opens up horizon into deep space

vantage point

lower (more intimate) than Perugino’s

increases area that figures’ occupy

RAPHAEL’s Italian High Renaissance Marriage of the Virgin (c. 1500) vs. PERUGINO’s Italian Early Renaissance Delivery of the Keys (c. 1475)

RAPHAEL’s Italian High Renaissance Marriage of the Virgin (c. 1500 CE) vs. Classical Greek Nike Adjusting Her Sandal from the south frieze of the Temple of Athena Nike atop the Acropolis (c. 425-400 BCE)

Raphael’s Italian High Renaissance Madonna of the Meadow (1505-1506)

RAPHAEL’s Italian High Renaissance The School of Athens (c. 1500)

Raphael

Galatea (1513)

theme: mythological

composition:

dynamic  movement & gestures

stabilized 

principal narrative figure placed along CVA

implicit triangular format  angels above

color: vibrant/localized red cloak complimented by aqua green

figures: idealized

poses: dynamic

moves beyond “contrapposto” in Botticelli’s Birth of Venus

perspective:

linear  established by human figures’ movement rather than architecture

overlapping

foreshortening

aerial  view into deep space

(Left) Leonardo’s Leda and the Swan (1510) vs. (right) Raphael’s High Renaissance Galatea (1513)

Raphael

Pope Leo X (1517)

figures: realistic

unflattering physical features

does not falsify sitters’ personality

composition: synthetic

principal figure placed along CVA

dynamic diagonals & lines of sight/gazes

color: vibrant, rich textures

light/shadow: variation of “chiaroscuro”

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 2: RAPHAEL. Self-Portrait (c. 1500)

Slide 3: RAPHAEL. Marriage of the Virgin (1504), Oil on panel, 67 x 46 ½ in., Milan, Italy.

Slide 4: (Left) RAPHAEL’s Marriage of the Virgin (1504); and (right) PERUGINO’s Delivery of the Keys (c. 1480), Fresco, Sistine Chapel, Vatican, Rome.

Slide 5: (Left) RAPHAEL’s Italian High Renaissance Marriage of the Virgin (c. 1500 CE); and (right) Classical Greek Nike Adjusting Her Sandal from the south frieze of the Temple of Athena Nike atop the Acropolis (c. 425-400 BCE)

Slide 6: RAPHAEL. Madonna of the Meadow (1505), Wood, 44 ½ x 34 ¼ in., Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.

Slide 7: RAPHAEL. The School of Athens (c. 1510), fresco, Stanza della Segnatura, Vatican, Rome.

Slide 8: RAPHAEL. Galatea (1513), Fresco, 9’8 ½ ” x 7’4”, Villa Farnesina, Rome.

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 9: (Left) Leonardo’s Leda and the Swan (1510); and (right) Raphael’s High Renaissance Galatea (1513)

Slide 10: RAPHAEL. Pope Leo X with Giulio de’ Medici and Luigi de’ Rossi (c. 1518), Oil on panel, 60 5/8 x 46 7/8 in., Uffizi Gallery, Florence.

Attachment 4

ART HISTORY 132

Italian High Renaissance:

Leonardo da Vinci

© Joel Hollander, Ph.D., 2020

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)

biography: illegitimate son

significance: “Renaissance” man

talented in wide range of endeavors (e.g., art, engineering)

informal education in Latin, geometry and mathematics

training: under tutelage of Verrochio

contemporary in Florence w/ Botticelli, Perugino, & Ghirlandaio

patron: Duke of Milan; Francis I (FR)

style: disegno ” (vs. “ colore ”) tradition

defined as both “drawing” and “design”

draftsmanship regarded as prerequisite for good painting

establish basic artistic principles of anatomy and perspective (linear/aerial)

sketches, studies, and cartoons to aid execution of finished pictures

Leonardo da Vinci

Vitruvian Man (c. 1490)

medium: ink on paper

theme: Humanism (Vitruvius  Roman architect)

significance: form est. by mathematical proportions & geometric shapes

figure: idealized proportions

man in two superimposed positions w/ arms and legs apart

inscribed in circle and square

light/shadow: dramatic passages

Leonardo

Madonna of the Rocks (1483)

motif: cave (rock formations)

biography  as youth, discovered a cave; driven by curiosity to find out what inside

Humanism  Plato’s Republic “Allegory of the Cave”

figures: idealized quality of naturalism

composition: stable

CVA

implicit triangular format

color: muted

light/shadow: chiaroscuro

perspective:

forestortening

linear  no explicit use

aerial  view into deep space

vanishiing point  shifted to left

Leonardo

Madonna, St. Ann & Christ Child

date: c. 1505-1507

style: “disegno” tradition

technical skill of line & drawing

conception & intention of finished work

“external physical manifestation of an internal intellectual idea or design” (Zuccaro)

composition: centralized

light/shadow: “chiaroscuro”

chiaro  “clear” or “light”

oscuro  “obscure” or “dark”

strong contrasts between light and shadow

extraordinary sense of sculptural dimensionality

figures: massive

(Left) Classical Greek Three Goddesses from pediment atop Parthenon (c. 450 BCE) vs. (right) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Madonna, St. Ann & Christ Child (c. 1500)

Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Last Supper (1495-1498)

(Left) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Last Supper (c. 1500) vs. (right) Giotto’s Gothic Last Supper (c. 1300)

(Left) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Last Supper (c. 1500) vs. (right) Castagno’s Italian Early Renaissance Last Supper (c. 1450)

(Left) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Last Supper (c. 1500) vs. (right) Donatello’s Italian Early Renaissance Feast of Herod (c. 1450)

Leonardo

Mona Lisa (1503-1505)

patron: Francesco de Giocondo

wealthy Florentine merchant

narrative: commemorates birth of 2nd son

narrative tone: secular vs. religious

motif: head covering

figure: idealized

facial features (eyes, mouth)

hands/fingers

pose: seated, ¾ view (Classical)

composition: stable

central vertical axis

implicit triangular format

color: muted

light/shadow: chiaroscuro

perspective:

foreshortening  arm; shoulder

linear  balcony ledge; winding road

atmospheric (aerial)

vanishing point  shifted to right

“sfumato”  smoky, hazy effect

(Left) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Mona Lisa (c. 1500 CE) vs. (right) Roman Republic Portrait of a Lady (c. 50 BCE)

(Left) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Mona Lisa (c. 1500) vs. (right) van der Weyden’s Flemish Early Ren. Portrait of a Lady (c. 1450)

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 2: LEONARDO. Self-Portrait (c. 1515), Red chalk.

Slide 3: LEONARDO. Vitruvian Man (c. 1490), Ink, 13 1/2 x 9 5/8 in., Galleria dell’Accademia, Venice.

Slide 4: LEONARDO. Virgin of the Rocks (1483), Oil on panel, 6’3” x 3’7”, Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Slide 5: LEONARDO. Cartoon for Madonna and Child with Saint Anne and the Infant Saint John (c. 1505-07), Charcoal heightened with white on brown paper, 4’6” x 3’3”, National Gallery, London.

Slide 6: (Left) Classical Greek Three Goddesses from pediment atop Parthenon (c. 450 BCE); and (right) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Madonna, St. Ann & Christ Child (c. 1500)

Slide 7: (Left) Picasso’s Ma Jolie (c. 1910); and (right) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Madonna, St. Ann & Christ Child (c. 1500)

IMAGE INDEX

Slide 8: LEONARDO. The Last Supper (c. 1500), Fresco, 15’2” x 28’10”, Convent of Sta. Maria delle Grazie (Refectory), Milan.

Slide 9: (Left) LEONARDO’s High Renaissance The Last Supper (c. 1500); and (right) GIOTTO’s Gothic The Last Supper (c. 1300).

Slide 10: (Left) LEONARDO’s High Renaissance Last Supper (c. 1500); and (right) GIOTTO’s Donatello’s Early Renaissance Feast of Herod (c. 1450)

Slide 11: (Left) LEONARDO’s The Last Supper (c. 1500); and (right) CASTAGNO’s Early Renaissance The Last Supper (c. 1450).

Slide 12: (Left) Leonardo’s Italian High Renaissance Mona Lisa (c. 1500 CE); and (right) Roman Republic Portrait of a Lady (c. 50 BCE)

Slide 13: LEONARDO. Mona Lisa (c. 1505), Oil on panel, 30 x 21 in., Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Slide 14: (Left) LEONARDO’s Italian High Renaissance Mona Lisa (c. 1500); and (right) VAN DER WEYDEN’s Flemish Early Renaissance Portrait of a Lady (c. 1450)

Attachment 5

Visual Analysis PowerPoint Project

One of the more traditional assignments that students encounter in an introductory Art History class is to analyze the stylistic qualities of an art object held in a museum collection and compare it to a variety of pieces that share a similar subject matter. Students will be required to select one (1) painting that can be viewed digitally (a selection of which are provided in Blackboard) from the Lowe Art Museum on the University of Miami campus that has a very fine collection of Renaissance to Rococo period paintings donated by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation on permanent display in the Kress Wing.

Once having selected the painting from the Lowe’s digital collection, pay close attention to stylistic features (i.e., composition, color, use of light/shadow, perspective, figures, pose, gestures, et al). Describe the object and compare/contrast it to pieces we have studied in class, whether in the PowerPoint lectures or in the textbook. Be discerning when selecting objects to compare. That is, try to find pieces that share more characteristics than not. As a guide, a separate PDF that introduces students to the fundamentals of how to think about a Visual Analysis had been uploaded into Blackboard.

The aim of this assignment is for students to develop an eye for style and locate the subtle differences that distinguish one art movement or period from another. As such, organize the PowerPoint project in a logical, analytic fashion (i.e., chronologically). Conclude the paper with a slide that includes remarks about the significance of the object that became the centerpiece of the analysis -- that is, how it fits into a larger art historical framework.

An approximate guideline for how many slides to include in the body of the presentation is fifteen to twenty (15-20). This includes slides that establish context and/or discuss technique; slides with pictures of the objects and analysis that is organized by bullets; comparison slides; and a slide that contains concluding remarks. At the end of the PowerPoint project, include an “Image Index” (essentially, equivalent to “Works Cited” or bibliography) that contains information (e.g., artist, title, date, materials, size, and collection) about each object and/or comparison. Examples of an Image Index are included at the end of each PowerPoint uploaded into the Blackboard units.

Submission of this PowerPoint project should be uploaded into Blackboard, rather than attached to an email or message.

Due Date: Sunday, September 27, 2020