THE BIOLOGICAL THEORY OF CRIME CAUSATION

Researchers continue to conduct studies to improve the biological theory of crime causation, and this is important because it has several implications on legal and medical practitioners. The biological theory of crime causation argues that criminal traits are heritable, and this implies that an individual with criminal traits is likely to repeat offenses. Such an issue will enable legal officers determine the best way to deal with criminals.

The historical and intellectual background of the biological theory of crime causation

The neurological system is critical in controlling an individual’s behavior and perspectives on antisocial behavior or crime. The brain is the center of any individual’s personality, and studies in the biological theory of crime causation analyze various biological factors such as serotonin activity, specific genes, neurological deficit, and other factors such as malnutrition.


Causal arguments of the biological theory of crime causation

Describe the biological theories of crime causation and their policy implications.

During the first half of the 20th century, as the social sciences developed, biological theories of crime causation became less popular. The public became wary of biological typology after the National Socialist (Nazi) leaders in Germany relied on theories of racial superiority and inferiority to justify mass murder during World War II (1939-1945). However, with the passage of time and the development of sophisticated technologies in the field of biological sciences, biological theories of criminal behavior have reappeared.